Twin Peaks – Season 3: “The Return, Part 17”

Showtime’s Twin Peaks
Season 3: “The Return, Part 17”
Directed by David Lynch
Written by Lynch & Mark Frost

* For a recap & review of Part 16, click here.
* For a recap & review of Part 18, click here.
Pic 1Gordon (David Lynch) laments that he “couldnt do it” when it came to Diane (Laura Dern). But he and Tammy (Chrysta Bell) and Albert (Miguel Ferrer) talk about bigger things. 25 years ago, Gordon and Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) were told by Major Garland Briggs about an “extreme negative force” called Jau Dei long ago. Over time, it became Judy. This is what Jeffries talked about that day when he came back, what we see in Fire Walk With Me. Of course Phillip disappeared while searching for Judy. And Cooper, before disappearing, warned Gordon that if he were ever to supposedly vanish, they ought to do whatever possible to find him. Furthermore, Ray turns out to have been an informant, alerting the FBI that the bad Coop, the doppelganger is searching for Briggs’ coordinates. We’ve already see some of that, too.
Finally, Coop’s message before he left the hospital gets to Cole. The pieces are coming together for the FBI. “A Blue Rose Case, most definitely,” says Gordon. Now they’ve got to head back to little ole Twin Peaks all over again.
A shot of electrical wires in the darkness, electricity sparking. We’re with bad Coop in the car, on the road, just as we first saw him in The Return. At the same time, in Twin Peaks, the other prisoners see the woman from that place beyond the Black Lodge, the woman with the wounds for eyes. She makes almost monkey-like noises, driving the others insane. Can she feel the dark electricity coming with the doppelganger, bad Bob Cooper?
Note: There was a monkey face in Fire Walk With Me, behind the young boy’s white mask, we see it briefly as the mask comes off in a close-up shot. Another link in the chain, considering the woman’s noises are not monkey-like, they ARE monkey noises.
Pic 1AOut past Twin Peaks in the woods, bad Coop finds that hole in the ground, next to the thin white tree. Electricity crackles nearby. Then, one of the cyclones appears swirling in the air. And he disappears.
We’re in that auditorium-like place beyond the Black Lodge. Screens show images of the forest, the Palmer house, Major Briggs, Agent Cooper. The place is a massive industrial environment. Contraptions appear then retract. The Fireman (Carel Struycken) seems to direct the whole place. The screen shows bad Coop, off somewhere on a road.
Then he’s there on that same road, eyes onyx black. He’s right outside the Twin Peaks Sheriff’s Department. There’s Andy (Harry Goaz) in the parking lot, greeting whom he believes is his old buddy, and inside the poor women in the cell’s still going mad. Not to mention Chad (John Pirruccello) looks to have a hidden key. Meanwhile, nobody has a clue the evil walking amongst them. Although Andy might’ve had a premonition, or perhaps he saw something during his little trip out beyond the Lodge that he’s only now seeing fully.
Shit goes haywire once Andy goes looking for Hawk (Michael Horse). He runs across Chad, who’s gotten out and gotten his hands on a gun. But before he can do a thing, Freddie Sykes (Jake Wardle) uses his crazy fist he got from the Fireman to put the guy down. All is safe. For now.
Until Sheriff Frank Truman (Robert Forster) gets a call from the actual Coop while bad Coop’s sitting in front of him. Then before the doppelganger can put a shot in the sheriff, Lucy motherfuckin’ Brennan (Kimmy Robertson) puts a bullet in the bastard! YEAH! Our girl’s a hero, after all these years.
Lucy: “Andy! I understand cellular phones now
But, oh, yes… the dirty, bearded men covered in scorched engine oil return. Lights flicker. They poke and prod at the downed doppelganger. Right as Coop arrives. Then when the men are done, a black, floating orb with Bob’s grinning face in it floats above them, attacking, threatening. Coop calls Freddie forward who says it’s his “destiny.” The orb comes at him, attacking. Until he whacks it with the glove a couple times. It hits the floor, then he punches it through, a blaze of fire erupting from the hole it leaves. Except that’s not enough, and the orb  comes back. One more punch sends the thing flying into pieces, Freddie left bloody, but standing. Afterwards, Coop lays the owl ring on his doppelganger, and the body evaporates.
Pic 2Screen Shot 2017-09-03 at 10.42.01 PMRemember the random room key? Well, Coop asks Truman if he’s got it. Full circle. Then he also sees the woman from that industrial place, recognising her. Once Gordon and the others show up, including Bobby Briggs (Dana Ashbrook), he fills everyone in on the madness that’s been happening around them.
In the face of the scarred woman, Coop sees the Black Lodge. Then a sort of empty crater of a face where Diane appears. Suddenly, the real Diane is back. Appearing in the room. She’d been trapped in the Lodge, in the form of that woman, just as Coop was once trapped in a form of his own, and her doppelganger was out causing mayhem. WOW! What a reunion.
Before anything else can happen a great blackness swallows everything. In a void of light, Coop, Diane, and Gordon walk someplace. They come to a door, where Coop uses his old key from the Great Northern. He leaves the other two behind, heading inside. There, he finds the One-Armed Man (Al Strobel), reciting the poem ending in “fire, walk with me.” More electricity crackling, and they’re off.
Coop goes to see Jeffries, the tea kettle. He asks about 1989, getting clues in the form of steam shapes: the owl symbol, two diamonds connected, an eight or an infinity symbol or a road with a car on it. All very cryptic, certainly. When they’re done the One-Armed Man speaks the word “electricity” …
and we cut to a spinning fan, the Palmer house, Leland (Ray Wise) staring out the window as his daughter Laura (Sheryl Lee) speeds off with a young James (James Marshall). A flashback. Coop watches the young lovers in the woods that night, professing their love. He’s even the reason she screamed for no apparent reason, believing she spotted someone, something. And she does see him later, in full view. “Ive seen you in a dream,” she tells him. He reaches out a hand, holding onto her. The dead body on the beach that day disappears, and Laura steps into the future, the present with Coop.
Pic 3Pic 3AWe see eerie visions of the Palmer house. The place pulses with electricity, it goes dark, reddish-tinted. Sarah (Grace Zabriskie) moans and cries in the background, sounds of agony and torment. Then she starts smashing the place up, she violently breaks the picture of Laura sitting in the living room.
Coop leads Laura back through the forest. In the dark they hear a vicious screaming. Soon, we see only red, the curtains flowing. Music. The end.
Only one part left.
Screen Shot 2017-09-03 at 11.13.47 PMWHOOOOOA. Frost and Lynch doing fan service in the only way they know how: ultra-surrealist magic. What a beautiful penultimate chapter to this amazing show. Good lord.

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Twin Peaks- Season 3: “The Return, Part 7”

Showtime’s Twin Peaks
Season 3: “The Return, Part 7”
Directed by David Lynch
Written by Lynch & Mark Frost

* For a recap & review of Part 6, click here.
* For a recap & review of Part 8, click here.
Pic 1Jerry Horne (David Patrick Kelly) is in the woods, a bewildered look on his face. More than just a good bake on from his killer bud. It’s like he knows there’s something bad in that forest. He calls his brother Ben (Richard Beymer). Seems as if he’s had his car stolen. Turns out he’s actually just high. Too high.
Deputy Chief Hawk (Michael Horse) finds pages of Laura Palmer’s (Sheryl Lee) diary, from the previous episode, and shows Sheriff Frank Truman (Robert Forster). These are the pages torn from the diary, connecting not only to the TV series, but also to Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. They talk about who Bob was possessing, as well as relay the message from Annie – about the “good” Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) being stuck in the Black Lodge. Hawk susses out that whoever it was came out of the lodge  those 25 years ago was the “bad Cooper.”
Afterwards, Frank calls his brother Harry to talk about the whole thing. What I’d like to know is where is our former sheriff? Is he ill? Sounds like it. A little later the new sheriff calls Dr. Will Hayward (Warren Frost) about the night he went to the Great Northern, to check on Agent Cooper. The doc remembers it, very well. Seeing the agent and that “strange face again.” Moreover, we hear our first rumblings about Audrey Horne (Sherilyn Fenn), how she was in a coma after the bank exploded.
Pic 1AOut on the road Deputy Sheriff Andy Brennan (Harry Goaz) talks with a very nervous, paranoid man. They’re set to meet at 4:30. This guy seems like he’s up to no good, but I don’t see Andy as being the type to be up to anything shady. So what’s the deal?
One of the cops with the case concerning the decapitated head, the body in bed receives a military visit. About the prints they’ve found, what seems likely to be the corpse of Major Garland Briggs. Only there’s a bit of an age discrepancy. Briggs would be much older by now, the body’s less than a week old. How can it be him? Oh, I have a few ideas. Involving space and time. Colonel Davis (Ernie Hudson) gets a call about the prints, the body, and now there’s so much more afoot.
Gordon Cole (Lynch) sees Special Agent Albert Rosenfield (Miguel Ferrer) at his office, reporting on going to see Diane (Laura Dern), who wasn’t exactly forthcoming. Their relationship is hilarious and perfect. They go speak with Diane, she tells them both to go fuck themselves. She and Coop apparently didn’t leave things on good terms. They want somebody close to him to go talk with the Coop sitting in federal lockup, to gauge what’s happening. Eventually she agrees and they’re on the plane. Then Special Agent Tamara Preston (Chrysta Bell) shows them a slight problem with the fingerprints, tedious, almost unnoticeable to untrained eyes. Like someone did a bit of doctoring. Or perhaps, Coop slightly changed.
At the prison, Diane comes face to face with her old pal. He’s clearly different, his voice is unsettling and deep. He wonders why she’s so upset. She asks about the last time they saw one another. “At your house,” he replies (almost like the Mystery Man from Lost Highway; eerily reminiscent). A night they’ll both never forget, apparently. She can see a different person sitting behind those eyes, someone she doesn’t know inside his skin.
Diane: “That isnt the Dale Cooper that I knew
Armed with this affirmation from her which he trusts in wholly, what’s Gordon to do next? Back in his cell, the bad Coop asks to speak with the warden “about a strawberry.” Uh oh.
Pic 2On a lonely road, Andy waits for the paranoid man with whom he met earlier. At the guy’s house, we get the feeling of something ominous behind his open front door. Only Lynch could make a simple shot of a door like that feel creepy. One of the many reasons the man is a master filmmaker.
Coop and the warden meet. The bad man speaks in cryptic fashion, as usual. About “dog legs” and other bits. He mentions Joe McClusk, the late “Mr. Strawberry” and this puts the warden in his chair. Bad Coop requests a car for himself and Ray Monroe. Gun in the glove compartment.
At the Lucky 7 offices, Dougie (MacLachlan) goes about his infant-like day, Anthony Sinclair (Tom Sizemore) snooping around wanting to know more about what he’s been up to lately. Of course he gets no answers, nobody does. Then the police come to speak with Mr. Jones about his car. They mention deaths during the explosion of his car, gang members and such.
Outside the office, Janey-E (Naomi Watts) and Dougie are attacked by the small hitman, wielding a gun now. Instinctively Dougie moves “like a cobra” wrestling him to the ground, chopping him in the throat. In the pavement he sees the Man from Another Place, in his newest form, that brain on a tree. It commands him to “squeeze his hand off.” So Dougie chops the guy in the throat one more time, freeing the gun from his grip. SO INTENSE! The sound design in this scene is so foreboding, you can feel something coming
At the Great Northern, Beverly Paige (Ashley Judd) shows Ben a strange hum emanating from one of the rooms. They can’t pinpoint where it’s coming from, or what’s making it. They follow it around awhile, but still can’t figure it out. At the same time they’ve received the key from Cooper’s old room, from all those years ago. A slice of strange nostalgia for Mr. Horne. Beverly has her own difficult life; a very ill husband named Tom (Hugh Dillon) to look after, being cared for in hospice. They also don’t have a great relationship, it seems. He makes her feel guilty, or she perceives it that way.
Pic 3I love Lynch because he intrigues us, and he also gives us slices of anticipation where we see a long shot of the Bang Bang being swept, Jean-Michel Renault (Walter Olkewicz) at the bar working silently. And nothing happens, for so long. Because Lynch knows we’re paying attention. He doesn’t do this for shits, he does it to make sure we haven’t fallen off.
Then a call comes in, Jean-Michel running his greasy business as it always was, like 25 years ago. Trouble, too. I wonder who owes him, and what this will mean for the plot in coming episodes.
In jail, the bad Coop is released from his cell, as is Ray. They’re let out the back quietly, given a phone, keys to a vehicle. Off again, jiggity jig. Wonder where they’re heading first? Meanwhile at the diner in Twin Peaks, life goes on as usual. I love the way Lynch intertwines the mystery and the everyday, going from such a dark, mysterious moment into one of comfort, one of familiarity. And even underneath the beautiful music, the old 50s and 60s guitar swooning in the background, there’s an undercurrent of that threatening, foreboding sound design, building and festering. Perfect atmosphere.
Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 12.38.08 AMAnother good episode, this one a bit less heavy on the surrealism and the absurd, more a classic episode of Twin Peaks we’ve come to know. I’m excited because with 18 episodes, Lynch and Frost have the opportunity to take their time a bit, which they do with relish. All the same it’s good, it isn’t frustrating for those of us Peakheads who love the mystery, the intrigue, the surreal. Can’t wait for the next episode already.