Legion – Chapter 7

FX’s Legion
Chapter 7
Directed by Dennie Gordon
Written by Jennifer Yale

* For a recap & review of Chapter 6, click here.
* For a recap & review of Chapter 8, click here.
Pic 1The Eye (Mackenzie Gray) is stalking, closer and closer, behind Kerry Loudermilk (Amber Midthunder). She tires to run and hide, though it isn’t easy to escape him.
And watching as always, the Devil with the Yellow Eyes, a.k.a Lenny Busker (Aubrey Plaza). She’s got Amy Haller (Katie Aselton) in her grasp. She asks Amy about when David (Dan Stevens) first came to live with their family. Sly little visual reference to Professor X, as his wheelchair dissolves past in an image while Lenny shouts: “What did he do with it?” Hmm.


In the meantime, Cary (Bill Irwin) has found his way to Oliver Bird (Jemaine Clement) in that astral plane lounge. They drink, chat. Oliver wants to help however he can with the parasite that’s attached itself to David. Apparently the monster is called Amahl Farouk, the Shadow King. He’s sequestered David in the deep recess of his own mind. The longer this goes on, the more chance Farouk takes over the body entirely. This prompts Cary to come up with a plan. A wacky one, though a plan. Starting with the diving suit.
First visit is to Syd (Rachel Keller), removing the headphones keeping her subdued in the dreamy space of David’s childhood room. Cary brings her away to a safer place, so they can talk; she already knows the whole deal. Because she’s smart. Sort of ruins his excitement of explaining in hilarious fashion. Regardless, the plan is underway.
The halls of the hospital are absolute havoc. Good thing Syd’s got special glasses to cut through Farouk’s created imagery. Cary always keeps a few tricks up his sleeve, just like Oliver.
Meanwhile, Dr. Melanie Bird (Jean Smart) is drifting through the abstract, too. She comes across the diving suit with Cary inside, as well as Oliver in the room where their gunfight went down. Only the husband can’t remember his wife, his memory’s been affected quite a deal. It’s good to have him there, if only to help think through their next steps. But it’s what Melanie does next that’s interesting. Whispering in a Rudy’s ear, who in the later part of the timeline is stuck in a wall. But for now, Cut to Syd – she slips a pair of those nifty glasses onto Kerry, thwarting The Eye on the way.


Stuck in a “mental coffin” David faces British David (fun with Dan speaking in a native British accent). His rational mind. It’s all “just an idea” and the monster’s implanted in their head. Farouk is manipulating David’s mind, and in turn the wild mutant powers he wields. Very fun seeing the two sides of David, led by the rational mind, work out the problems with logic and reason. We’re watching the visual representation of the mind at work. And eventually, rational David convinces the other part of David the monster’s been around since he was just a child. Beautifully conceived sequence, all around! References to X-Men abound in this episode. Even as David figures it out, he gives his long lost father a British accent, not yet knowing his identity.
So the monster waited, watched after being defeated by David’s father, then found David, possessing him. Torturing him and feeding off his energy. Its parasitic machinations were to regain its own power to take revenge. Usually such exposition would feel lame, overdone, tedious. This doesn’t because of a) the visuals, and b) the storytelling works because of David having this two-way conversation with himself. Glorious fucking writing and directing, all around a fantastic job in this episode particularly.


Syd and Kerry keep moving forward. As does David, breaking through room after room, many of them the same, hearing Syd call for him. Melanie and Oliver and Cary, they work on their side of things in the room of that gunfight; Oliver does some wonderful conducting on the astral plane. This is even wilder and weirder and more fun than the previous sequence. Add in title cards like a silent film as Syd calls to the others, fighting alongside Kerry, and the whole thing’s more interesting than you can handle.
This will blow your mind, honestly.
Then Lenny shows up. She (literally) crushes The Eye, who’s of no use any longer. What a wild effect, such good work! And in that frozen gunfight, The Eye’s head starts running with blood. However, Lenny infiltrates that space, tossing Oliver to the side. Free to do as Farouk pleases.
Simultaneously, Cary puts the device on David’s head, Rudy grabs hold of Lenny, and with the full influence of David’s mind the place is under his control again: he saves Syd. But takes the bullets; catching them in his hand, like a true bad ass. All is well again, at least for now. Everyone returns, and so they can return to reality once more.


And who else came back – Oliver himself. His memory not ransacked like on the astral plane. Then there’s also a divide between Cary and Kerry, the latter feeling abandoned by the former in a deep way. Although things are better, they aren’t all perfect. It’ll do at the moment.
David and Amy get time together, as well. She feels bad for not telling him about the adoption before. But she finds it cool he’s a mutant. He does, too. Sadly Amy has to stay away from her family for a while because of D3, all the madness.
Furthermore, David has flashes of the monster inside. He wants to get Farouk out of him, and fast. Before who knows what happens. Yet they can’t do that because the interrogator David long thought he was rid of at D3 returns, burned up face and all. He’s got men with guns. Threatening to kill everyone else, except David. Oh, shit.
Not to mention deep down inside him still lurks Lenny, Farouk, the Devil with the Yellow Eyes. And that nasty bastard wants out. Strangely enough, it might actually help to let the devil out to play.
Pic 5Pic 5AI keep thinking I’ve seen my favourite episode of Legion yet, then Noah Hawley & Co. come at us hard with another visionary chapter in this impeccable first season. One of the best debut seasons of any series; ever. I’d take that to the bank. So excited for the season finale. NOW GIVE US SEASON 2, QUICK! Mainline it to my veins.

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Legion – Chapter 6

FX’s Legion
Chapter 6
Directed by Hiro Murai
Written by Nathaniel Halpern

* For a recap & review of Chapter 5, click here.
* For a recap & review of Chapter 7, click here.
Pic 1Dr. Melanie Bird (Jean Smart) sits with therapist Lenny Busker (Aubrey Plaza), who talks with her about her frozen husband. They’re in a dangerous place. Next is Ptonomy Wallace (Jeremie Harris), talking of his mother who died while unloading the dishwasher. Then, Kerry and Cary Loudermilk (Amber Midthunder & Bill Irwin) ruminating on their likeness, their relationship (“Whos it hurting?”). Even The Eye (Mackenzie Gray) must have a session with Dr. Lenny.
Syd (Rachel Keller) is the only one to formally question their current reality. But it’s just more medication and off Syd goes back to the halls of the institution in which they’re all patients. In the lunge, Ptonomy and David (Dan Stevens) talk about a drooling, near comatose patient sitting in a wheelchair across from them.
Continually we see that Syd knows something isn’t right, she sees a different door than usual in one of the hallways. Yet nobody else does, and the more she tries to alert them the further Dr. Lenny meddles. And David, he’s sucked into that little world. Far too much.


At dinner, Amy (Katie Aselton) – a nurse in their facility – won’t let David have any pies. “Its just pie,” he quips when Syd offers not to eat in solidarity. Her next bite is filled with insects, swarming. Only it isn’t. But we’ve seen that before, right? Another sign of that Devil with the Yellow Eyes. If that weren’t enough we focus on the pie, as Lenny’s face is revealed in a nice cross-fade. Before a fun musical number with her edited in various ways across various places in David’s mind. Love the visuals of this series as a whole. And Lenny is the perfect chaotic embodiment of the mess going on inside David. Legion gets my vote for one of the most visually exciting TV shows of all time.
Syd: “You ever have that feeling like somethings happened before, except differently?”
David and Syd talk about their life in that hospital. He’s not keen on getting out because of his prior experiences. He can’t handle real life. Although what he knows, or thinks he knows there with Dr. Lenny, it’s all a lie. Syd knows this, and she doesn’t want to stay. She keeps on having a dream; about the moment before they wound up in that place. Creepy. Cary and Kerry, Ptonomy, Dr. Bird, David, they’re convinced in a need for treatment. But Syd keeps pushing.
And The Eye never stops sneaking, watching.


In the night, Cary sees that place Oliver showed us. Just beyond consciousness. Cary reaches out for it then everything around him disappears. Then he’s in a forest of stars. Across from him someone in an old diver’s outfit, like Oliver. But is it him? Or someone more sinister?
Syd begins to articulate to David that the facility they’re in may be a “version of reality” and not anything concrete. He insists it’s part of her psychosis, why she’s in there, maybe. He says she’s delusional. That he isn’t schizophrenic. It confuses her completely. Again, something isn’t quite right.
She comes across a strange, soft spot in the wall. Blood leaks out. Triggering memories, all sorts. They flood back to her relentlessly. Afterwards, Dr. Lenny turns up offering some music therapy, a nice pair of headphones. And once more Syd is subdued, thrown off track. She floats on to the sound of crickets.
When Kerry goes to find Cary she only finds The Eye, being utterly terrifying. Worse, she doesn’t know where her other half is gone.


David has a run in with his sister Amy, the nurse. She tells him he isn’t wanted there. Nobody likes him. “Youre a freak, youre disgusting,” she says. Then she gags and gags and gags without actually throwing up. Wow, that’s more unsettling than I’d have thought! And the mindgames, good lord. Poor David is being thrashed mentally. The closest person to him, his blood, telling him he’s revolting. That is deep and sharp and awful.
In her room Melanie sees Oliver. Or, someone in the diver’s suit. I worry for her, she seems particularly fragile out of the group. Then she follows the diver through a wall into a tunnel; at its end a flashing light. Further on she goes, in past a locked door, and this leads her down to a dark place. We see the moments before they were transported to that hospital. Bullets in mid air, frozen. She can’t piece it together. The diver points, suggesting she change the course of events. Yet always watching are the eyes of Dr. Lenny.
Speaking of, she tries convincing David that Syd isn’t the “right girl” for him. She has a grim conception of love, which he believes he has with Syd. She has a lot to say about power. And that it is in itself the entire point of life.


Dr. Lenny drops a bomb, too: she knew David’s father. Whoa! “I found you,” she taunts menacingly. Furthermore, the Devil with the Yellow Eyes wants to merge their powers. It needs the physical form.
Lenny: “I could give a shit about your mind
Later on, Syd gets a visit in her trance-like state from a man in a diver’s suit: Cary himself.
Pic 5LOVED THIS EPISODE TO DEATH! Jesus. Only gets better with every chapter. There were so many wild things happening here, and the story’s various strands twist together so well. A ton of great acting on top of all the solid writing. What a series. Already renewed for Season 2. Even a bit of David Bowie at the end of this episode; fucking sweet.

Legion – Chapter 5

FX’s Legion
Chapter 5
Directed by Tim Mielants
Written by Peter Calloway

* For a recap & review of Chapter 4, click here.
* For a recap & review of Chapter 6, click here.
Pic 1Cary Loudermilk (Bill Irwin) is going through the motions as his spiritual counterpart Kerry Loudermilk (Amber Midthunder) is brought back to Summerland, injured and in need to medical attention. In the meantime, David Haller (Dan Stevens) talks to Dr. Melanie Bird (Jean Smart) through glass, saying he’s met her husband, which shocks her though in a sense likely calms her knowing Oliver’s still out there, somewhere.
When Kerry’s in stable condition, Syd (Rachel Keller) goes to talk with David about who he is, what they’ve found in his past. He proves to her they can be together, in the physical headspace he creates with his powers. Reality’s just an illusion. He can make places in his mind, transfer them into what others perceive as reality. While it looks and feels like they’re touching one another, Rachel’s only imagining everything as David creates it. On the surface there’s a romance. But underneath is something sinister, or the possibility of something sinister. Great imagery in this scene, as at the end we focus in on a bowl of strawberries crawling with bugs. Where hides the Devil with the Yellow Eyes?
David: “Im the magic man
There’s also the question of whether Oliver can come back from the astral plane, if David can bring him. Of course Melanie hopes so. This also has repercussions in the world of Loudermilk; what happens if this is true? That would fundamentally change the relationship between him and Kerry. So interesting, a lot of things revolving around Oliver and the whole concept of the astral plane.
Pic 2Turns out Oliver essentially experienced a downfall, mentally, in the sense that he wanted to be the “creator” of his own world, entirely, and he’d sometimes just sit there, conjuring up another reality in his mind. Melanie is desperate to see her husband, hoping David can bring him home for her. I feel that sinister quality rearing its head quite a bit in the early parts of this episode, in David. Lenny (Aubrey Plaza) and the Devil with the Yellow Eyes, same person or not, have had a nasty effect on him. He’s also got that yellow triangle shirt on; the logo looks suspiciously like an eye, too. It’s almost eerie how quick and forceful he uses his powers to seduce Syd into their alternate reality bed. Worse, she opens up, both intimately and emotionally/mentally. I worry.
Syd: “Who teaches us to be normal when were one of a kind?”
Oh, and speaking of Lenny, she turns up in David’s head. Speaking like Shakespeare’s Iago into the ear of David’s Othello. Influencing him. As if that weren’t enough, they’re in a neon red lit room. Although when Syd gets up to see who David’s talking to, he and Lenny are gone.
Together, Dr. Bird, Syd, Ptonomy (Jeremie Harris), they start figuring out how to tackle this latest problem. Ptonomy feels they’re fighting “a war” and it isn’t all about David, or his sister. Melanie thinks it’s best they track David down because if not, and they turn him, it could mean trouble for them. Big, big trouble. It’s hard not to believe she wants him around most of all to see Oliver again.


When the team arrives at D3, where they assumed David’s heading, they indeed find a trail of carnage: bloody SWAT members, people half stuck between concrete, overturned vehicles, fire. All set to “The Daily Mail” by Radiohead; perfect! Inside the facility, the group splits into two, heading further on. They find Dr. Kissinger, the only one remaining where Amy (Katie Aselton) was kept. They find the security footage of David breaking in, and it’s so clear he isn’t himself. Just in the way he prances around using his powers. That sinister thing inside him rages, showboating and having fun killing people. And when Dr. Bird sees the thermal footage, it’s clear: the Devil with the Yellow Eyes has taken him hostage, from the inside out. Moreover, the nasty thing, an “older mutant” is rewriting David’s memory, as well as those who come in contact with him in those reality-bending landscapes.
It wears a human face
In another one of those places, Syd discovers David, playing banjo and singing, crying. The bathroom’s still lit neon red; in there, the World’s Angriest Boy in the World lurking, David’s imaginary pet dog King. The whole place is creepy. Out in reality, Amy tries to apologise to her brother for not seeing the truth about him before. Yet she doesn’t realise what’s hiding in his skin. Then out comes Lenny to interrogate and taunt. That Devil with the Yellow Eyes has always been there, since he was a boy. He was King, then that Angry Boy, then Benny, or Lenny, and whoever else. Amy finally reveals the truth, that David was adopted. And if you don’t already know, he’s the son of another powerful mutant; not sure if that’ll be revealed in its entirety soon, if at all in the series (I’m sure it will at some point).


The team goes back to David’s childhood home. A place filled to the brim with terrors. Also blanketed in silence, as we watch a heavily stylised, awesome sequence leading up to Kerry taking charge over Cary and leading the way with a spiked baseball bat through the house’s dark corridors. Upstairs is Amy, and Lenny, too. She is a ruthless entity. Devious and horrible. Then, in his disguise, The Eye (Mackenzie Gray) bursts through firing his gun at David. And in the other reality, Syd is confronted by the Devil with the Yellow Eyes in its awful, true form.
Lenny: “This is not the talking place. This is the listening place.”
Suddenly, they’re all sucked into a therapy session, somewhere else. Lenny’s the therapist, and the rest of them are patients. Uh oh. This is getting dangerous.

Pic 15Each episode is better than the last. Challenging us, and the characters, as to what IS reality at any given moment. So clever, great writing. Can’t wait for Chapter 6 next! The back half of this season is going to get even wilder as we near a finish.

Legion – Chapter 4

FX’s Legion
Chapter 4
Directed by Larysa Kondracki
Written by Nathaniel Halpern

* For a recap & review of Chapter 3, click here.
* For a recap & review of Chapter 5, click here.
pic-1We open on Jemaine Clement playing Oliver Bird, husband of Dr. Melanie Bird (Jean Smart). He paraphrases Friedrich Nietzsche’s quote: “Under peaceful conditions, the warlike man attacks himself.” He speaks about the fear of the unknown, and violence as ignorance. Everything around him’s cold. Very, very cold. Then he mentions empathy v. fear in telling stories to children. Ought to remind us of David Haller (Dan Stevens) being told the story of that angry boy.
Back to present events. Syd Barrett (Rachel Keller), Ptonomy Wallace (Jeremie Harris), Dr. Bird, they’ve been sucked into the world of David, the one trapped in his head. There’s no telling if anything is real, at any point in time. At Summerland, Cary Loudermilk (Bill Irwin) tells them there’s no medical explanation for why David’s in a coma-like state now. Neither he nor Ptonomy can figure it out. He’s stuck between dreams and reality, somewhere. They’ve got to discover what happened to David before he wound up at Clockworks Hospital, what damaged him so bad.
pic-2Off they go, searching for answers. They go to the places where his memories took them. First, the office of Dr. Poole (Scott Lawrence). Ptonomy and Syd discuss what happened in David’s memories, the abnormal “tear” in the physical space where they experienced those moments. They find a recording device from the doctor’s sessions, beaten, bloody hand prints on it – using their powers, it comes back to life and tells them of a possibly brutal, violent crime. Poole was beaten horribly with savage force. But, did David actually do that? Or was it the dark entity, The Devil with the Yellow Eyes? Did he break into Poole’s office originally to steal things for drugs? Was it something else? We’ll see.
What did the stars say?”
Poor Amy Haller (Katie Aselton) is still being held captive, too. She’s not faring well, psychologically. Although she discovers there’s someone else nearby locked in a cell just like her: David’s former doctor at Clockworks. She laments not realising sooner there was something different about her brother, since he was young he moved from “room to room” and even further at times. He talked to people frequently, such as their dog King. Only they never had one.
Everyone around the man’s been affected. Amy is in a cell, alongside the doc. Meanwhile, Syd, Ptonomy, and Kerry Loudermilk (Amber Midthunder) are searching for the clues that will lead them to the answers. We get the story about the Loudermilks, or, well… the one Loudermilk. They share a body, Cary and Kerry. Two people in a single body, though the experience for each of them isn’t entirely identical, Kerry exists in a sort of spirit state while Cary is the more corporeal form on a regular basis; she comes out to play when necessary.
In her office, Dr. Bird has a vision of a person in an old school-type diver’s suit. She tells Cary of the incident, hoping it’s a sign David may be coming back to the land of the living. The guy in the suit is Oliver. His physical body is kept frozen in a chamber downstairs.

pic-7David, in one of his mindfuck landscapes, meets Oliver. Not really, he just gets a wave from the diving suit-clad dead guy. To follow him elsewhere. So, they head into the great unknown together, as David follows him to a ladder. Up, up, up. This leads to that place where first we saw Oliver, talking to us. That freezing place. There, Oliver sits for a drink and a chat with his new friend. “Whats real in this space is whatever you want it to be, so, my feeling is: why not wait in style?” he quips to David.
Bad news – David’s lost. Good news? Oliver has himself a bit of company. And someone to bounce beat poetry off when the mood strikes. They get to talking about David and his powers, the monster waiting for him around every corner. Now he’s intent on getting out of that cold place. He plunges back into the “vast subconscious” in order to make his way back to real life. If possible. Oliver certainly doesn’t assuage any fears, warning him things get tricky out there, outside of that protected place.
Ptonomy and Syd go to visit David’s ex-girlfriend. To scan her memories. They need to find more of his past, from wherever it comes. Back through a few of them, Ptonomy watches a dinner with the formerly happy couple and Dr. Poole. Then he finds traces of another memory within it: they know where Poole lives. Ah, and more comes to light! Lenny (Aubrey Plaza) was actually a drug pusher named Benny. Plus, the ex tells Syd and Ptonomy ominously: “Tell him theyre watching.”
Oh, my. So many questions. Implanted memories, hidden secrets.
What is real?
pic-8They track down Dr. Poole at a lighthouse, who’s reluctant to speak about David. Soon he tells them about the good and bad sides of his former patient. He says he’d actually like to see David again. Because he needs answers, after having his entire life ruined. Afterwards, they find themselves trapped by The Eye (Mackenzie Gray). Nothing is real. Armed men lay siege to the lighthouse. The trio run upstairs, but Kerry’s ready to take the offensive to their attackers. A fight breaks loose, where Kerry fights (and Cary goes through the motions back at Summerland), and we also see The Eye in action for the first time, he has his own powers. Unfortunately, Kerry’s taken down. But Syd, she touches The Eye with her bare hands. You know what THAT means!
Note: This is one of the best sequences of the series so far in these first four episodes. So powerful, exciting. Gives us awesome insight into the Cary-Kerry dynamic, as well.
David’s brought into another headspace with/by Lenny. She has things to talk about with him. She chastises him for going with Dr. Bird, ending up in Coma Land. He only wants the truth, even if she’s intent on her own designs. She riles him up into an angry, terrifying state.
Lenny: “Uncle Fiddly with the glasses and the angry girl inside him, they could be fingering you right now.”
Then suddenly, David is in the woods. He runs a truck off the road containing Syd and the others; he doesn’t realise there’s been a switcheroo. This starts up an awkward chase, as David urges Syd – The Eye – to run. When they switch back, The Eye puts a bullet into Kerry, sending Cary back at Summerland into a bleeding tailspin. Not so sure anymore that Lenny’s there to help David, not at all. Seeing as how she appears on his shoulder, while her hand looks suspiciously like one belonging to the Devil with the Yellow Eyes.


Another fascinating Chapter in Legion! Wow. Every one gets better visually than the last. I don’t doubt we’ll see the momentum charge forward in Chapter 5. Lots of weird and wild action afoot.

The Exorcist – Season 1, Chapter Ten: “Three Rooms”

FOX’s The Exorcist
Season 1, Episode 10: “Three Rooms”
Directed by Jason Ensler
Written by Jeremy Slater

* For a review of the penultimate Chapter Nine, “162” – click here
screen-shot-2016-12-17-at-12-40-29-amAngela Rance (Geena Davis), under possession of the demon Pazuzu, strangles the life from her daughter Casey (Hannah Kasulka), as Henry (Alan Ruck) and Kat (Brianne Howey) watch helplessly. But then Father Tomas (Alfonso Herrera) arrives. To fight. However, he’s worried that the “integration” is complete. He wants to believe it hasn’t happened. Hard not to believe. “Lets see the measure of your conviction,” Pazuzu challenges before tossing Tomas into the air like a doll. The demon touches him and suddenly he’s in a little room in Mexico, a house, and then he sees… Father Marcus (Ben Daniels), sitting on his bed. But it can only be a vision, something the demon wills upon him.
Because the real Marcus has been captured, at the hands of Brother Simon (Francis Guinan) and Maria Walters (Kirsten Fitzgerald), the latter of whom is constantly put down by everybody around her; how long until she turns on her demon friends? Well, at least Marcus has company – a still alive, still wisecracking Father Bennett (Kurt Egyiawan), though worse for the wear, is tied up in a chair alongside him. What Simon offers is integration. Join their legions, or die. And the clock, it’s ticking, as the nasty demon in the Brother cuts each of the priests open, letting them bleed.
Marcus: “A whole eternity listening to your poncy little speeches? Kill me now


Back in that little dream-room in Mexico, Tomas talks with Marcus. The older priest talks of integration, taunting Tomas. Can the younger of the two make it out of his own head, away from the influence of Pazuzu? The dream-Marcus urges Tomas to wake up, else he die, too. Then there’s Pazuzu still controlling Angela, the entire family. All of a sudden the demon realises there’s a piece left to Angela, something he didn’t snatch up yet. She’s still in there, the integration isn’t complete.
What I love about this episode is the dream world Slater is drawing out for us. We’re headed inside the possession rather than seeing all the external effects. Essentially, we see the cause. Angela finds herself in a dark hallway, the demon coming towards her, scraping its fingernails along the walls. It’s genuine terror.
Pazuzu: “Little pig, little pig, let me in!”
Tomas, in his dream world, confronts the death of his mother, as Marcus continues whispering in his ear. He literally confronts her death – a dead, torn face from cats who ate it off. He then sees her die, alone in bed.

screen-shot-2016-12-17-at-12-55-27-amNow we find out more about Marcus. He shot his own dad with a poaching rifle, which got him sent to the school where he learned his trade. Brother Simon goes at him mentally about the “lonely trail” of his life. He wants to convince Marcus into joining their plan. The parade for Pope Sebastian (Bruce Davison) looms, so the demons have bigger things to do. Things don’t look good, though. Maria’s been pushed as far as she’s willing to go, or so it seems. Worst of all, Simon has released the ash of vocare pulvere into the air. Is it going to take him? Bennett? Maria?
At the Rance house, they’re playing Spin the Hammer. Naughty, nasty Pazuzu wants Casey to bash her sister’s knees in after it lands on Kat. If she doesn’t, the demon will haul Henry’s arms off. This is a tragic moment, as Henry tries to reassure his daughters of his love for them. And before the countdown ends, Kat grabs the hammer and crushes her own knee.
Looks like the ash is taking Bennett, swirling around him, trying to draw his mind to the legion of demons. Then he gives in. “Poor little Renfield, left all alone to eat your bugs,” Marcus laughs at Maria, left behind by her demonic friends. Such a great reference and even better delivery out of Ben Daniels. Instead of taking Bennett, the plan of Marcus worked, and Maria receives the demon’s influence. The two renegade priests break free of their bonds while Maria gets what she’s always wanted.
But what worries me most is Father Tomas. Can he push through? I believe he can. He wants to, and the Rances need him. With a blade to his neck, Tomas finally breaks free of the spell. He admits to his sins, bares his soul. Afterwards, he wakes to fight against Pazuzu. Just as Casey fights against it, willing her mother to come back.
Tomas: “I have hope and I have faith. These things are not weaknesses, they make me what I am.”
Marcus: “And whats that?”
Tomas: “An exorcist


But who will win? Tomas shouts his prayers at the demon, commanding it to leave Angela. He works with every bit of his being to cast Pazuzu out, and Casey joins him with Holy Bible in hand. The whole family gathers reciting The Lord’s Prayer.
At the same time, Pope Sebastian has hit the streets of Chicago. His motorcade passes the hordes of people waiting to wave at him, to catch a glimpse. And Father Marcus, bleeding out more and more, tries hard to save him.
Cutting back and forth between these two scenes is fantastic, the tension is thick. Once the demons in the crowd at the parade start to bring everyone to their knees, and Pazuzu rages in his hallway, things get intense. Brother Simon and his crew of demons go to the Pope. Before Simon can do anything Marcus cuts his throat. The spell on everyone is broken, the Pope is rushed away to safety, and Marcus rushes off.
Angela opens the door in her mind, but not to let Pazuzu in: to invite him into a fight. She bashes his head in on the floor of the hall, closing the door on him to leave him in darkness. Outside, Angela nearly breaks in half, seemingly dead; her family left to mourn.


Father Marcus sits with Casey, who’s glad to be done with the entire mad affair. He is a sweet man and comforts her the best he can. She wonders about the others he’s helped, how many were actually saved and got better. “Hurt me all you want, but the bastards dont get to win,” Marcus assures Casey, and tells her how strong she is despite the Rances many troubles.
Off the Rance family goes in their car, headed away from Chicago and all its terrible memories. Marcus, he’s left to keep on battling for souls. What about Tomas? He wants to train to be an exorcist. He wants his new friend to stay, to teach him. Tomas has now seen the true face of God and is more compelled than ever.
But we can’t forget about Maria Walters and her friend Superintendent Jaffey (Tim Hopper), and the others; they’re still kicking around. “Sebastian was never the finish line,” Maria tells the Superintendent. I can only imagine what the demons will plan next.
Oh, and Angela, she’s not dead. In a wheelchair, but not dead. The Rance family is safe and sound out in a country house, enjoying their lives. For now.
screen-shot-2016-12-17-at-1-20-33-amscreen-shot-2016-12-17-at-1-22-16-amEven if they don’t #RenewTheExorcist, as they should, FOX did well with this Season 1. I truly hope they give this a Season 2 because there’s so much more to explore. Not just with the Rances, but with the demonic influence still on Earth. Plus I feel like Casey would make a great addition to the exorcism team of Fathers Marcus and Tomas.
Either way I loved this season so much, it was brilliantly written and the fantastic cast lifted the material up every chance they got. Cheers to all involved!

Frontier – Season 1, Episode 6: “The Croaking Raven”

Discovery Canada’s Frontier
Season 1, Episode 6: “The Croaking Raven”
Directed by Ken Girotti
Written by Greg Spottiswood

* For a review of the penultimate Season 1 episode, “The Disciple” – click here
screen-shot-2016-12-12-at-1-47-55-am
The finale is here. What a first season this has been! Very impressed with my fellow Newfoundlanders. A few of my friends actually work on the show and they’ve had a great time shooting. Currently they’re working on Season 2.
With Declan Harp (Jason Momoa) being brought into the forest by Sokanon (Jessica Matten) and Michael Smyth (Landon Liboiron), Fort James still firmly under the thumb of Lord Benton (Alun Armstrong), what will happen next?
Declan will be okay. Yet this is only a part of his journey; he’s a ways to go before it’s even close to over. Physically, he’s on the way to healing. He cauterises his own wound by the fire, taking it like a champ. Already he looks fit to take on Benton and his redcoats all over again.
Side note: love the theme song, it’s a damn fine introduction to the show and gets you kind of pumped. The entire score is wonderful, really. Gives the period of the series an interesting feeling.
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Captain Chesterfield (Evan Jonigkeit) is apprehensive about moving forward with his plans to become Governor. Although having a woman like Grace Emberly (Zoe Boyle), strong and confident, cheering him on is a help. Not sure exactly how I feel about Chesterfield, given that he’s shown himself to be nasty. My only thought is whether he’ll prove to be useful down the line. Right now, Grace shows him out then discovers Harp in her back room. For a guy that everyone knows, and many are looking for, Declan doesn’t care about waltzing through the fort. Bad ass, or too easy from a writing perspective? I’m not sure. Either way Grace helps him out so he doesn’t perish. She consoles him when he weeps for his wife and his child, having been tortured and killed mercilessly by Benton.
At the same time, Sokanon, Michael, and Clenna (Lyla Porter-Follows) head back through the woods to find Declan. A fight breaks out between the two women, before Sokanon throws them both to the ground and leaves. Clenna isn’t so keen on following, but Michael’s sure in his path. Along the way she winds up falling and breaking her leg, badly.
Grace: “Ive waited so long for you. You cannot leave me. Not like this.”
Declan: “Im sorry. I have to do this.”
Meanwhile, Benton is gearing up to do in Harp and anybody in his way. No matter what: “Declan Harps head is to be stuck on the end of a bayonet and displayed in the yard.”

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Samuel Grant (Shawn Doyle) and Cobbs Pond (Greg Bryk) are now in Fort James at the Ale House, to speak with Grace. They head out back for a drink, a chat. Grant wants to see her furs, but she’s not impressed with the surprise. Then he gets passive-aggressive, forcing her hand. She makes clear her position in Fort James is vital. But Grant, he’s a mysterious one. I’m excited to see more of his character next season. He then goes over to see Benton, who calls Grace a “whore with more ambition than sense” and that almost seems to hit Grant with unease. Then the Lord gets into a bit of tough talk. And right outside lurks Harp; something only Mr. Pond senses.
At the Ale House, Malcolm Brown (Michael Patric) sits with Chesterfield. The Captain is surprised. Then Malcolm goes on about his brothers, Cedric and Douglas (Allan Hawco); he says the former was a mess, but he’s still going to take bloody revenge. It’s only Grace what breaks them up. She takes Chesterfield aside to tell him about Grant, which doesn’t make the man too happy. He then turns violent. Now I’m sure: this guy is bullshit. I hope Grace sticks a knife in his gut.
Not long after Sokanon and Michael arrive with Clenna. And the young Irish girl’s in rough shape. She’s also worried about Michael leaving her. Not to mention she may lose a leg if Grace can’t fix it. The bone doesn’t set properly the first time, so they’ve got to break it. Then set it again.
And while things go on, Grant and Pond plot their next move. From out of the dark woods comes Harp. They’re finally face to face. “Were both committed to the demise of the HBC, are we not?” says Grant. So he and Harp work out their terms, which end with the latter knifing Benton and cutting off his head. THAT, my friends, is a plan. Plus he has Sokanon on his side. For her part, she doesn’t want to trust Michael. She’d rather they charge ahead together. However, Harp is on a one-man warpath. He tasks her with keeping Michael on their side, training him, and forging on.


Ms. Emberly goes about her sneaky business. She meets with Malcolm and tells him about Chesterfield, his daily walks. To avenge Cedric’s murder. Or is it all a ruse to get Malcolm right where Chesterfield wants him? Hmm. I’m going to bet that it’s the first option, and that Chesterfield will manage to get out alive, leaving a possibility of trouble for Grace afterwards. Just a guess. Sure enough, the Captain and Malcolm duke it out hard before Chesterfield beats him near to death, only stopping when Father Coffin (Christian McKay) interrupts.
Together again, Sokanon and Michael try to figure out what to do. He wants to be loyal to Harp, but not to let him go it alone, even if Sokanon agreed to leave him be. Michael heads out and finds his friend in the woods, determined to help. Simultaneous, we see Grant walk with Benton, as he worked it out with Declan. They talk business, as the Lord is unsuspecting of what’s just around the corner, figuratively and literally.
Benton: “You have stones, Mr. Grant. But if you think I wont cut them off and feed them to the ravens, youre wrong.”
Grant goes on to let Benton and his redcoats know Declan is in the woods nearby, waiting to kill him. A fight breaks loose, and once Benton calls for Michael to be killed, Declan chooses to save him. Landing right in the hands of Pond, Grant, and Benton, as Michael gets away. Although things aren’t sitting well with Grant and Benton, they’re still not on the same side. The Lord reluctantly lets him and Pond leave, no punishment, but the relationship’s not merry. Down in the dungeon, Harp is chained to the floor, captured like déjà vu.


While Michael must leave Clenna behind, he goes on with Sokanon and Grace – as well as Imogen (Diana Bentley) and Mary (Breanne Hill) – to enact a plan to spring Declan free. It involves gunpowder, if you couldn’t have guessed! Oh yes. And they’d better get moving. Harp is brought out to a stage, fitted with a noose round his neck, a crowd and Benton watching on.
A fire is lit. An explosion flames from the woods. Guns go off. Declan is dropped from the platform and hung by the neck, but frees his hands to break the noose. Benton tries to shoot at him and Father Coffin takes a bullet. In a climactic moment, Michael shoots Benton before he can fire on Declan. When Chesterfield tries shooting at him, he’s already gone.
Out in the hills by the ocean, Harp crawls, bloody, freezing. He passes out, alone in the wilderness. Will he survive? Will someone find him?
We’ll have to wait and see.

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What a finale! Wow, was it ever wild. The cliffhanger ending is exciting because really, even if there weren’t already a Season 2 in production (it’s being shot here in Newfoundland currently), this could end on an interesting note. But there’s more coming. And I, for one, cannot wait. I’ll have to, though. At least we can watch these over again, drink in the nicely captured period setting, locations, and the great cinematography. I have to say, the acting was damn good, for the most part, too. A satisfying Season 1 for Frontier.

Westworld – Season 1, Episode 10: “The Bicameral Mind”

HBO’s Westworld
Season 1, Episode 10: “The Bicameral Mind”
Directed by Jonathan Nolan
Written by Lisa Joy & Nolan

* For a review of the penultimate Season 1 episode, “The Well-Tempered Clavier” – click here
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We begin as Dolores Abernathy (Evan Rachel Wood) is put together. Her skin is attached to the robotic skeleton, Bernard Lowe a.k.a Arnold (Jeffrey Wright) assembling the pieces. She comes online, not full yet physically but mentally put together as a whole. “Welcome to the world.”
In the present, she shaves The Man in Black (Ed Harris) with the blade of a knife. He continues on about the centre of the maze, how she brought him there once. For a long while the town was buried, after which Dr. Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) resurrected it. She still sees Arnold, too. And off she goes after him, Black behind her following.
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William (Jimmi Simpson) continues on with former buddy Logan (Ben Barnes) tied up. He wants to find Dolores. He needs to find her. Now he’s looking for an army to help him: the Confederados and Lawrence (Clifton Collins Jr) will do just fine.
Poor ole Teddy Flood (James Marsden), he wakes up after another day of being murdered only to start the whole Sweetwater experience over again. Except time starts slowing down. He sees corpses everywhere he turns, remnants of his former life. Then he sees Dolores in her blue dress, a wolf running past the dead. And then all returns to normal, as Teddy ends up in a quick draw with a stranger. Life carries on. But he’s intent on finding Dolores. Seems like all roads lead to her.
She finds Arnold kneeling in a pew of the church we see over and over. “I know where your maze is,” she tells him gladly. We switch back and forth between her with Arnold, and her with Black. She’s lost between the two spaces somewhere. At the church’s graveyard, she uncovers her own grave. A cross with her name on it. When she digs into the earth she finds a tin, and inside it is the maze’s pattern. Arnold tells her about the maze. It concerns consciousness. First, it started with a pyramid, then it became the maze: “Consciousness is not a journey upward, its a journey inward.” Arnold hasn’t been pushing her towards hearing his voice. He’s been pushing her to hear her own. But how does Dolores give Black his answers when she hasn’t quite figured them out for herself?
What we see more of is how Arnold wanted the hosts to be, versus what Ford wanted for his vision. Then there’s Arnold and his plan: he wanted Dolores to kill all the other hosts to prevent Ford from doing his will with the park. Is that why Teddy killed everybody in that town? Did she enlist his help?
Well we also come to find Black has bought Westworld. “This place feels more real than the real world,” he says, mocking the place for all its lies. He wants to make the place very real; “one true thing.” But she believes in William, that he’ll come to find her.


Ole Will. He and Lawrence are scoping out the next move ahead. This is going to involve a good deal of violence. More with each episode now, each scene almost, we see William is turning his back on that former nice guy persona. He’s really getting into the swing of things. Out in the real world, Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman) and Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) discuss her plans of nudging Dr. Ford away from Westworld. I just keep thinking everybody’s underestimating the old guy.
In other parts of the company, Maeve Millay (Thandie Newton) is taking things up a notch. She’s making adjustments to park security, as well as her “friends” such as Hector Escaton (Rodrigo Santoro) and Armistice (Ingrid Bolsø Berdal). Oh, this I can’t wait for!
Charlotte reveals to Ford the board has voted for his retirement. After he premieres his new narrative. Things are changing at Westworld.
The creepy lab tech who has sex with the hosts is tasked with taking care of Hector. This dude is a serious weirdo. He puts in some earbuds, ready to rock. Now you know something bad’s about to happen. One tech has to slip his hands in Armistice’s mouth, which gets him a digit bitten off. Meanwhile, rapey tech is greasing up for a session with Hector, and the other guy gets his finger fed to him. No longer can the techs contain the hosts. More people are about to die. “They dont look like gods,” says Armistice of the real people when Maeve arrives to round them up. The hosts then finds who revised them to be able to wake from their sleep manually: Arnold, or so it seems. It’s a lot of fun to see the humans frightened of the technology of whom they assumed to be masters.


Dolores takes a bad beating from The Man in Black, as Flood and William are both headed for her. Who’ll get there first? Right now, anybody would do. Or, can William actually find her? Black knows about William, and where his path actually took him. Is he really The Man in Black? IS HE? TELL US WESTWORLD! You’re sure teasing us well. I can dig it.
We see William, becoming more violent as time passes. Getting a taste for murder. Sure wouldn’t surprise me at this point if he and Black were one and the same. Then, we finally get to see him pick up that black hat. After so much speculation, here we are at a definitive identity. We watch as William went back to Sweetwater, searching for Dolores, as he couldn’t stop thinking of her for a second. And she didn’t remember a thing, not like the love that existed in him. He saw it for what it was: all a game.
And now Dolores sees nobody is coming for her. Not like she thought. Black wants to go further, to find what lies at the centre of the maze. Even better? Dolores needs no man, no one to save her. She has discovered herself. She’s heard her own voice, like Arnold hoped. Everything has changed. When Dolores takes a knife to the gut, she does get a little help from none other than Teddy; the one man in her life that won’t ever change.
Dolores: “Time undoes even the mightiest of creatures. Just look what its done to you.”
Outside in the Westworld facilities, Maeve and her band of merry hosts head for the basement, filled to the brim with inactive robots. Also where Arnold a.k.a Bernie lies in a pool of his own blood. And now he’s being brought back online, with intense purpose.


On the plains of Sweetwater, Ford and William meet. The doctor says there is nothing at the centre of the maze, not for the guests. It’s just a game. William needs more, to validate himself and his life’s meaning. “This is your petty little kingdom, Robert.”
What exactly will Ford’s newest narrative be? I feel like everyone’s in for a damn big surprise.
Someone altered Maeve’s storyline. She’s been tasked by somebody to escape. “These are my decisions, no one elses,” she claims. Someone has been controlling her. But WHO? WHO? Nevertheless, the hosts are rising up, they’re manipulating people and the system. Westworld’s soon going to have major trouble on their hands.
Dolores tells Teddy about being trapped in their world, forcibly, made to feel and think everything, made to do what their makers want. Then she dies in his arms. One of many deaths she’s already experienced, and surely will experience again. Unless the uprising changes all that for good.
Then we pause a moment. It’s all part of the new narrative “Journey Into Night” by Ford. A new beginning, for him, for the park. Charlotte, Lee, they all assume this is the end for Dr. Ford. I don’t see it. There’s something left up his sleeve. He has Teddy taken off to be cleaned up, but Dolores, she’s sent to the “old field lab.”
And just as the techs of Westworld track down their problems, the place locks tight. Security measures in full force. Maeve, Armistice, Hector, they head up to the higher floors. Their plan all but in full action. Men with guns show up, and that’s only the beginning of what’s sure to be a wild fight. With real guns in hand, there’s no telling what the hosts can accomplish. And they’re loving it. At a certain point Armistice stays behind to let the others go ahead, taking on armed men likely to gun her down. Hector gets left as well, as Maeve prefers to go it alone.
Oh, these violent delights indeed have violent ends.
Hector (to Armistice): “Die well.”

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In the lab Ford takes care of Dolores. He talks about her love of painting; Arnold encouraged it with a painting of “The Creation of Adam” by Michelangelo on the wall of the lab. Then Ford introduces the second coming of Arnold in Bernard. This rocks her world. We see a little more on Arnold, his maze. We see more of Ford and his argument with Arnold about the park, Arnold’s loading of the Wyatt narrative. So much to absorb, but incredibly written. This leads to Dolores killing Bernie a.k.a Arnold, and Teddy, as well. Before putting a gun to her own head. This was Arnold’s plan, although it didn’t work. The park still opened. Life went on. Fitting how Ford quotes Oppenheimer in this scene, worth mention.
Arnold: “The stakes must be real. Irreversible.”
Maeve goes on ahead, further into the real world. She further discovers her daughter is alive, in the park, of course. And out she goes, into the world of human beings, walking amongst them unknown. She boards a train and leaves Westworld, headed anywhere. Or will the desire to be with her daughter change that?
We find out more about Ford. He isn’t all bad. He encourages the hosts, particularly Dolores and Arnold/Bernie, to discover themselves. To escape. And then he too leaves the fake world behind. His narrative is the narrative he’s created to set the hosts free.
Dolores has discovered the voice inside herself, the guide. She is at the centre of the maze: consciousness, personhood, humanity. “Who I must become.” Who every host must become.


In the last moments, those numerous hosts from the basement of discarded people encroach on the people listening to Ford speak, coming out of the darkness. And in front of the crowd, Dolores shoots Dr. Ford in the head. Even William in his tux takes a bullet. And the hosts start their massacre of the onlooking crowd with their drinks and their fancy finger foods.
Thus ends the first season of an amazing series.
In a scene after the credits we watch Armistice cut her own arm off then attack a group of soldiers. Bad ass.
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Wow! I saw a lot of these things building, but holy shit. This was an impressive finale that held me from moment one. I really need Season 2 already. The story can lead so many places. What will Westworld become at the mercy of the hosts? Will we see them lead an army out of the park, or will they stake a claim for their world as their own? We’ll just have to wait and see.

Frontier – Season 1, Episode 5: “The Disciple”

Discovery Canada’s Frontier
Season 1, Episode 5: “The Disciple”
Directed by Ken Girotti
Written by Greg Nelson

* For a review of the previous episode, “Wolves” – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “The Croaking Raven” – click here
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Declan Harp (Jason Momoa) is now held captive by Lord Benton (Alun Armstrong) and the redcoats, whisked away to a nearby dungeon. All the men are sent out looking for Michael Smyth (Landon Liboiron).
Luckily for him, Grace Emberly (Zoe Boyle) is willing to give him shelter, as well as Sokanon (Jessica Matten). But she’s angry, that Michael’s brought this down on them, and Harp in particular. Now Declan’s set for a bit of serious torture.
Benton: “Were going to have a discussion about respect. Or more precisely, your lack of respect for me.”
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In Fort James, Grace is trying to keep things under wraps with the help of her barmaids, Imogen (Diana Bentley) and Mary (Breanne Hill). She’s also got to keep juggling her dealings with the ever greasy Captain Chesterfield (Evan Jonigkeit), who continues prodding her for information about whatever relationship she has with Harp. You can see that it all wears on her; side note: Boyle is an excellent actress, she is feisty and she can show so much with only an expression.
Over in the dungeon Harp’s being systematically mutilated; a cut for every man Harp has killed. “14 English soldiers.” Benton takes out his aggression on the man. For his part Declan takes it like a champ. The Lord wants him begging, but I don’t see that happening any time soon.
Poor Michael feels awful about leading the soldiers right back to Declan. He wants to go in and help, though Sokanon advises against rushing in foolishly. She’s another tough one. I love how unflinching the Native characters are in the series, it shows the resilience of their spirit not only through warfare and their fight, but through quiet moments such as the one in this scene between Michael and Sokanon.

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Montreal. Douglas (Allan Hawco) and his brother Malcolm (Michael Patric) Brown argue over what to do next concerning Samuel Grant (Shawn Doyle). Then, who else other than Cobbs Pond (Greg Bryk) arrives. With a gun in their faces. They’re headed for prison, having defaulted on a loan. So it’s either go willingly, or horizontal and without pulse. Elsewhere, widowed Mrs. Elizabeth Carruthers (Katie McGrath) goes to see Mr. Grant. She’s wary of him, his ruthless nature of business. He offers that they work together. Because she is a “woman in a mans world, a mans trade” in the devious fur trade. Hmm, now this is an interesting little relationship I can’t wait to see develop.
Chesterfield bursts into the Ale House with Clenna Dolan (Lyla Porter-Follows) in his grip. He threatens Michael with her harm. But Grace puts a stop to that and sends the Captain packing.
Benton taunts Declan about his father – “a proper company man, with his Indian wife and his young, halfbreed son.” Seems the father wanted Benton to take care of his boy, after he was gone. We learn more of Harp, how he was trained in many ways by the Lord. Like a surrogate father. “You were my disciple,” Benton says while driving a knife into Harp at the gut. This is the most intense scene of Frontier yet.
In a cell, the Brown brothers argue and wrestle over who’s the bigger asshole of the two. Then Mrs. Carruthers comes. She’s paying their debt to get them out. Only if they hand over the Low River Company, and one of them marries her. Well, is it really that bad of a deal? I don’t think so. Malcolm doesn’t like the idea, though. And then Douglas gets pinned with the murder of Mr. Carruthers. Ohhh, shit. Elizabeth agrees to try helping him. She then lays down the laws of her proposed marriage to Douglas: no touching, they live in separate rooms under the same roof, and no coming into her room, not ever. And the husband has to follow along with any decisions she makes for the company.


Stuck together in close quarters, Sokanon tells Michael of when Harp’s family died, her sister and nephew. “The screaming” and the burning of the camp. No sight of Benton or the redcoats. “There was so much blood,” she recalls in agony. So sad. So vile. Grace soon comes to believe she’s figured out where Declan is being held, as well. At least that’s something.
The torture of Harp continues. The taunting, too. Benton sees it as Declan having forced him into teaching him a lesson. As if the slaughter of a village, women, children, everyone is any kind of lesson. Just goes to show how deluded Benton’s become. “Im not destroying this world, Im bringing light into the darkness with the gift of civilisation. Lifting up the land and its people. It requires violence, yes, its a brutal place. But I am its saviour. I am its future. And I demand respect.” He then, essentially, asks Declan to pray to him, in a way so close to how Christians prays to God. Chilling.
There’s also Captain Johnson. He’s still making trouble around Fort James for the local redcoats, Chesterfield. Speaking of the Captain, he actually tries apologising to Grace for the way he treated Clenna and came around raging. This is when Grace tells him about what she and the barmaids got up to with Cpt. Johnson. Hopefully this stops the man’s meddling at the fort.
Grant receives Elizabeth, her new husband-to-be in tow. This surprises Samuel, though not really. He knows it’s what she’s doing to keep control; she isn’t marrying out of love. Every thing is a business. Only wonder is, now what will Grant – and his trigger man Mr. Pond – do going forward?
Finally, Michael and Sokanon decide to act. They’re headed to find Harp, with or without Grace. Clenna tags along, and the trio head out. They’re stopped in the street, but Michael takes the fall to let Sokanon and Clenna get away.

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Benton tries again and again to get Declan to beg him, to pray at his feet. But all Harp offers is a refusal to bow: “We are not the same.” Afterwards, the Lord explains to the man exactly how his family died. A disgusting story, of how the boy and his mother fought hard against their brutal murder. Salt in the wound, this tale. Revealing the unborn daughter of Harp in his dead wife’s womb, found after they killed her. Not long after Michael’s brought to the same dungeon as Harp, they’re left in the darkness, and Declan for the first time actually looks like a broken man.
Side note: if you’ve ever thought to yourself that Momoa can’t act, this scene is a testament against that; I felt my heart sink and my eyes well a little watching him in these moments, truly powerful.
Soon Lord Benton is being relieved of his command at Fort James apparently, due to Threadwell’s suspicious death. This prompts an outbreak of violence from Johnson when Benton and Chesterfield try kicking up a stink. Meanwhile, Sokanon plans to go back for Harp. This time Clenna offers up her services to “pick an English lock” and now we’ve got all kinds of ass kicking women doing their thing. I thought they’d hate each other, but Clenna and Sokanon are working together. And working damn well. Clenna does the talking, Sokanon does the hacking. They get inside to find Michael and Harp, the latter in terrible shape. Johnson winds up finding Declan, but the gang take him and another soldier on. Right before Michael puts a sword in the Captain’s face. Whoooa. Michael’s figuring a lot of things out about himself, that’s for damn sure.
In the shadows back at the Low River Company, Malcolm finds Grant lurking. He wants Mr. Brown to head off for some business. While he takes care of Elizabeth. Now that sounds downright rotten. Although it doesn’t seem to me like Malcolm cares, either way.


With Johnson finished off, Lord Benton is taking back Fort James before it ever really left his grip. And again must search for Harp, who’s being brought away from Fort James, somewhere safer in hopes he’ll survive the terrible wounds Benton inflicted upon him.


This is my favourite episode, out of a really stellar first season! I loved it. Intense, well acted, bit of blood. Plus the women really took control here and I’m always for seeing that perspective in a historical show. Next episode, the finale, is titled “The Croaking Raven” and I’m guessing we’ll see some kind of battle, maybe it’ll involve the Lake Walkers, too.

Frontier – Season 1, Episode 4: “Wolves”

Discovery Canada’s Frontier
Season 1, Episode 4: “Wolves”
Directed by Kelly Makin
Written by Greg Nelson

* For a review of the previous episode, “Mushkegowuk Esquewu” – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “The Disciple” – click here
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We start this episode in James Bay. Two redcoats spot a ship heading for land.
Lord Benton (Antun Armstrong) and Captain Chesterfield (Evan Jonigkeit) have a chat about dealing with the tribes; or, well, how they’ll dispatch of them. When they hear of a company ship approaching, they wonder exactly what’s going on. Hmm. Trouble abound?
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Declan Harp (Jason Momoa), Dimanche (WiLlliam Belleau), Michael Smyth (Landon Liboiron) and Sokanon (Jessica Matten) are cast out into the woods, no longer in the good graces of the Lake Walkers, specifically the new Okimaw, Machk (Raoul Trujillo). For his part, Harp feels they need to go their own way, take on Benton with their strengths and a bit of surprise. There’s a lot tension between Dimanche and Harp, the former not wanting to follow the latter; he leaves telling Declan: “Im taking the men with me.” Truly on their own now.
In Montreal, Douglas Brown (Allan Hawco) goes to see Samuel Grant (Shawn Doyle). Although he only gets to meet with the murderous Cobbs Pond (Greg Bryk). He makes clear this is how business will be going, they’ll take what they want. Furthermore, Pond tells Douglas about his brother Malcolm (Michael Patric), what Cedric pulled involving Kitchi and the Lake Walkers. One thing I know: don’t fuck with Mr. Pond.
Captain Benedict Johnson comes off the ship into James Bay, meeting Chesterfield, who tries to get information out of the man. But Johnson only wants to meet Benton. There’s going to be some trouble here, definitely. They head on into Fort James, to the Ale House of Grace Emberly (Zoe Boyle). Chesterfield ingratiates himself to Johnson and his men, trying to keep an eye on him.


Out in the woods, Declan tries to figure out whether he can trust Michael. The young man says he can indeed. Harp obviously sees something in Michael, a spirit of fighting; something the Irish know all about. Will these two stay on the same side? Or, will they end up against one another? For the time being, Harp sends Sokanon and Michael off on their own little quest, as he pushes forward by himself.
Captain Johnson is brought to the table of Benton, as the two and Chesterfield sit for a meal of caribou. Turns out that Lord Fisher back in London is wondering what “strides” Benton has made all around. We start to hear more about “a proper Christian example” that London hopes is being set in Fort James. Ah, yes, the spread of Christianity. Like a god damn plague. But worse, we hear that Johnson’s brought Clenna Dolan (Lyla Porter-Follows) to Benton; what’s he going to do with her? I worry. “Lets see if the sugar attracts any wasps,” the dastardly lord tells Chesterfield.
Then there’s Father James Coffin (Christian McKay) – I keep trying to figure out his place in all this, what he’ll eventually come to do or mean in the grand scheme of things. Right now he’s merely a drunkard, worth a chuckle or two. At the back of the Ale House, Chesterfield goes to Grace for the company ledger, which she made changes to so they can protect themselves while slipping pelts out from under Benton’s nose. Grace claims Johnson is likely here to oust Benton, but Chesterfield’s too dangerous and greasy to let that go down. What Grace does is send Imogen (Diana Bentley) to lure Johnson back to the Ale House; they’re going to use his religious faith “against him.”
Michael sees Clenna being brought through the woods, as he and Sokanon hide away. This sends him into a fit, heading off to find her. Clenna’s brought to the Governor’s house, where Benton acts brutally creepy. She worries, as one would, about what may be expected of her. You can already tell Benton will use Clenna to try bringing Michael in, and Declan too, he hopes.
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Declan goes to meet Grace, she tells him of Captain Johnson’s arrival. He needs gunpowder, a bunch, to take on Benton and whatever the Hudson’s Bay Company throws at them. They talk a good deal, about when Harp lost his family and stayed at the Ale House, how long they’ve known each other. Then Michael arrives to find Declan, telling him about Clenna. He thinks Benton is going to punish her. Harp decides not to do anything just yet, though knows the young Irishman plans on going after the girl on his own. “Michael Smyth would die for you,” Sokanon tells her fearless leader before heading out, as well. Lots of things happening. Now, Grace is helping Harp with the gunpowder, so long as he clues her in on the plans. I hope she won’t betray him to Chesterfield; I don’t take her as that type, but you never, ever know.
So Michael heads up after his lady. He locates her, asleep in bed. They reunite for the first time in a long time. A bit bittersweet with a hug and a slap from her. The young lovers are glad to be together again. Clenna doesn’t want to rush off right away, thinking they’ve got time to sit and have a wash and reminisce. Jesus, that’s not a good idea. But it’s because she is already being brainwashed by Benton, that Harp is a “savage” and all sorts of things. Michael leaves her there for now, heading back to his new friends, and Benton sees him go from the window. Uh oh.
Douglas Brown goes to see Mrs. Elizabeth Carruthers (Katie McGrath), wife of the recently deceased at the hands of Cobbs Pond. Brown brings the lady word that Grant would like to speak with her. She’s not so willing to meet: “You tell your Mr. Grant if he wants my company hell have to murder me, too.” Tough woman. I dig it.


Imogen can’t get Captain Johnson in her clutches for Grace, so she puts Mary (Breanne Hill) on the case. She goes for “virgin” rather than prostitute, hoping this will make the man more susceptible to their ruse. Mary does a good job, talking of her prayers, his faith, lots of that. She quickly makes an impression on Johnson. The lure’s been set. The Captain ends up in a room alone with Mary, as she tells him about naughty thoughts in her mind, to which he replies he understands “the flesh is tempting.” And this puts the man right where Grace wants him; compromised fully.
The letter from Grace, by way of Jean-Marc Rivard (Paul Fauteux), gets to Grant in Montreal. Well, to Bond, anyways. Rivard talks of Harp as a “crazy person” and that he’s unpredictable to everyone else, which intrigues Bond.
A corporal sent to speak with the Cree comes back burned to death, laid at the doorstep of Lord Benton and his men. Not only have the Lake Walkers fallen out with Harp, they’ve got a real fire in them against Benton, the Hudson’s Bay Company, anyone encroaching on their land. Meanwhile, Clenna goes to meet Michael, but she’s been lied to wildly by Benton, promising her so many things. Sadly the girl is afraid for her life, appropriately so, and she doesn’t want to follow Michael any further.
Harp and Sokanon are about to leave when Michael gets back to them. They’re ready for action, as redcoats bear down on the Ale House. Then, a fight. Harp helps Michael get free, killing several men, before he’s arrested by himself.

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Next episode is “The Disciple” and we’re about see some very intense emotions, fighting, and all out bloody madness. Let’s do this!

The Exorcist – Season 1, Chapter Eight: “The Griefbearers”

FOX’s The Exorcist
Season 1, Episode 8: “The Griefbearers”
Directed by Louis Milito
Written by Marcus Gardley

* For a review of Chapter Seven, “Father of Lies” – click here
* For a review of Chapter Nine, “162” – click here
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Casey Rance (Hannah Kasulka) is still possessed, her body tortured, her mind even worse. Father Marcus (Ben Daniels) is trying to do the exorcism, and now Pazuzu comes face to face with Regan MacNeil (Geena Davis) a.k.a Angela Rance, who came with Father Tomas (Alfonso Herrera). “Rags, bloody Rags,” the demon speaks to Angela. When Kat (Brianne Howey), Henry (Alan Ruck), and Chris MacNeil (Sharon Gless) arrive things get even more complicated. The demon lets Casey out long enough to haul them in. Taunting Kat about her dead lover, yikes. Then Pazuzu starts to toss the people around, and warns Angela about Casey’s new place in Hell: “Theres room for you, too.”
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Fathers Marcus and Tomas go about their exorcism, as Chris and the Rances wait outside. Finally a nice reference to Merrin in a quip from Henry. At the same time, Angela is staying strong to try making things easier for her family. Mother Bernadette (Deanna Dunagan) is out trying to keep a lid on the media, as well as the police. Naturally everybody’s sniffing around.
Over with Cherry and Lester Rego we find Father Bennett (Kurt Egyiawan) getting patched up after his encounter with the possessed homeless. They call the police on a burner to report the organs, too.
Continually we see Tomas and Marcus in each other’s faces. They resort to blows after insulting one another, all the while Bernadette is brought to her knees with the sound of flies swarming around them. Evil lurks around them all, as the demon laughs to itself at their fighting. So damn creepy, I love it. Marcus and Tomas know their best chance to fight the demon is to let Angela help. And she’s ready.
Despite the objections of Marcus, they let Angela into the room. He warns that if she starts feeling it poke around her head then they need to back off. “Hello, mommy,” says the demon. It gets going on everyone, taunting more all the time. Especially vulnerable is Tomas, who feels the pressure of the demon in his head. Angela does her best to distract her daughter, though Pazuzu keeps on talking. The worst is when it calls Angela out for having an abortion, saying she “scraped it out.” The priests and Angela come together telling the demon it is forgiven, hoping to use love against it. But will that work? I’m not so sure.
Bennett takes the pictures he took of the corpses to Cardinal Guillot (Torrey Hanson), as the news flashes about the police finding them in that warehouse. Will this Cardinal help, or is he another of the greasy Roman Catholic Church members in league with Maria Walters and Co?


Packing up to take off and hide awhile, Kat, Henry, and Chris argue over what happens next. They’re all on different pages, which is understandable. Even for all they’ve seen, Chris included, there is no rational way to react to the situation. Simultaneously, Casey suffers through the tortures of an exorcism, and Angela has a tough time watching what she’s already experienced so long ago.
Pazuzu makes it back up inside Angela’s mind. He takes her back to that house in Washington, D.C. Down in the old basement where Captain Howdy first spoke to Regan. She sees herself playing with the Ouija. If only she could replay that moment in time, do it all over. The Salesman (Robert Emmet Lunney) returns, little red bird on his shoulder. This scene is written so well. Perfect, in fact. The way the Salesman speaks for Regan, the way he talks to Angela. There’s an incredibly tense bit of dialogue between him and Angela, which they both play impressively.
Why me? Because you were under my foot, you stupid bitch.”
In the exorcism room things are going just as intense as ever. Angela makes it out of that old place in her head. Just in time to watch the demon start twisting itself into terrifying positions. Then it levitates, the chains break from Casey’s arms. And the evil washes away, as the girl returns to her mother. Have Marcus, Bernadette, and Tomas done away with Pazuzu for good this time? Oh, I wouldn’t get too cocky. Not just yet.

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Out Casey goes to an ambulance, the media swarming. Angela prays that her daughter is finally safe from the demon. She and Tomas ride with the girl to the hospital, as police and others look on with proper scepticism, and Bernadette quells the crowd of hungry reporters.
A SWAT team busts in on a derelict apartment. A homeless man, possessed, sits in the dark. Crosses hang upside down from the ceiling everywhere. The man then blows his brains away after asking if they can “hear the angels.” Nasty.
In a bar Marcus and Tomas celebrate, drinking beers together, joking for the first time in far too long. I love these guys, separately and together. Two fascinating characters, well written and well acted. “To standing in the doorway and pushing back the night,” Marcus toasts. Their night ends a little earlier than he’d like when Tomas heads out. ON television we see that there’s a plan to assassinate the Pope, which drives Marcus elsewhere.
Cardinal Guillot and Father Bennett ride in a car together, as the former talks of the Church, and those who are no longer loyal to its goals. Just as I suspected, Bennett is tragically dispatched with a plastic bag over his head.

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In church, Tomas finds Jessica (Mouzam Makkar) and her husband Jim (Andrew Rothenberg). Oh, that’s awkward. And not good, for anybody. He definitely isn’t pleased. He wants to know all about their affair. Jim says he’ll be reporting Tomas for his indiscretions, devastating both the priest and Jessica. I saw this coming a mile away, though hadn’t anticipated such a wild turn of events all the same. A rough turning point for Ortega.
Father Marcus begins piecing together bits and pieces of what is truly going on involving the possessed homeless. He may be onto something here.
Oh, and back at the Rance house with all the packing there are scarier revelations than anything else. Pazuzu, he found another way to carry on doing his dirty work. He’s made it back into Angela, after all these years. And when she calls her mother Chris a “little stinkpot” like Chris did to Regan back in her youth, grandma MacNeil gets her neck snapped backward, and the demon tosses her down the stairs.
Holy. Fuck.
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Another fantastic episode. They, literally, keep on bringing the twists! So unbelievably excited for the two part finale. First up is “162” next. Let’s stay tuned together, and let’s make sure FOX renews this series for at least another season.

Channel Zero – Candle Cove, Episode 6: “Welcome Home”

SyFy’s Channel Zero
Season 1, Episode 6: “Welcome Home”
Directed by Craig William Macneill
Written by Nick Antosca, Don Mancini & Harley Peyton

* For a review of the penultimate episode, “Guest of Honor” – click here
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Here we are at the end of the road to Candle Cove.
Mike Painter (Paul Schneider) sees himself laying in bed with his brother Eddie (Luca Villacis). They read about Long John Silver, as Eddie talks about understanding “why he does what he does.”  Then Mike is in a field with Eddie. He talks about how the other kids, the bullies, let out the bad spirit in him. All the still living brother wants is his daughter Lily back. Eddie becomes the Tooth Child, stuffing a hand down Mike’s throat.


Still through the television, Lily speaks to Mike in his hazy state underneath the static. At the same time, Amy Welch (Luisa D’Oliveira) and Gary Yolen (Shaun Benson) search for Francis Booth (Marina Stephenson Kerr). They head into the woods to find her from where last she was seen. They hear someone walking in the trees nearby, Alex Fry (Keenan Lehmann). Seconds later they see Mrs. Booth, as well as her band of creepy kids, which include Gary’s own children Dane and Katie. He tries talking to them and tells the kids about their mother’s death. Yet the other children approach with knives in hand. Eventually he convinces the two to walk away with him.
Mike and his mother Marla (Fiona Shaw) argue about what’s happening next. He tells her that it involves giving himself over to Eddie a bit in order to get his daughter back. When Mike’s estranged wife Erica (Kristen Harris) shows up things get worrisome. She wants to know where Lily is, right now. It all sounds insane to Erica when Mike says she’s in a place “where only I can go.”
Further into the forest Amy discovers a small trailer. Inside is Alex, hiding in a corner. Silent and eerie. So she heads out to try tracking Francis down once more, that tricky old broad.
In the meantime, Mike heads out to the Crow’s Nest with Erica. They see Lily lying in a clearing, as the Tooth Child – Eddie – appears from the bushes. It reaches a hand out towards Mike, who goes to it. He kneels in front of the thing, as it puts a hand inside his mouth to take the toll which needs paying.


After Mike passes out, he wakes… somewhere else. A television set plays static. Outside, a storm crashes with thunder and lightning. Mike goes out into a hallway, a familiar one we saw in a flash during the first episode, and he tries the various doors until one opens. There he sees students sitting in their desks, bloody little faces and hands. They hiss at him. So back out he goes, as one would. Then at the end of the hallway something appears. It wears a wide brimmed hat, making growling, animalistic noises in the dark. It shakes free the hat and whatever else is has on. It slams against the walls, violently. When the thing runs at Mike, it disappears into thin air.
But something else is still at the end of the hall, made of straw or wicker, and it burns, walking towards Mike with a head full of fire, beating hands against its face. That creature too retreats into darkness leaving Mike by himself. He goes on down the hallway to another room. This one is covered in skin, hung and dried from the ceiling. Some fresher, some much older. Further in he sees Eddie lying in bed. Not only that, the Skin Taker is there, the other creature from the hall. A vile creature. “Hes part of me,” Eddie explains. The Skin Taker (Olivier de Sagazan) rips its face open to take Mike “inside.”
He finds his daughter in that dark hallway, pleading with his brother to let them go. Eddie says he made that place “for both of us.” And he’s pretty pissed that Mike killed him. He wants to trade places and go back to the real world. So Lily crawls through the television into reality, free from the clutches of Eddie and Candle Cove‘s influence.
What of Mike? Eddie prepares to go back home, and Mike tries to keep him there. He wants to finish their never ending card game. Can he manage to get himself out of that terrifying place? Can he thwart Eddie’s plan of becoming him, to be the one that “everyone trusts” with their kids? Yikes.

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Marla ends up confronting Francis, who taunts her over Eddie. The two women trade jabs. A really great scene for Marla, the way she describes Francis and her ugly side. Things don’t play well for Marla, once Mrs. Booth starts hacking into her. Lucky, though: Amy comes out of the forest and shoots the crazy old bitch, calling an ambulance for Marla. What a wild little moment there!
The card game is finished. All those cards laid out. “You can do good in the world,” Mike tells his brother. But Eddie’s been lost so long in the world of Candle Cove, there’s no changing his mind.
A few months later, life moves on. Amy has stepped up as Sheriff, she gives a press conference concerning Francis Booth and her vicious crimes, cluing up the Iron Hill Murders of 1988 after nearly three decades. Gary and his children try to pick up and begin again fresh somewhere new. Marla is alive and well, Erica and Lily set to head back home.
On the television at grandma’s house Lily sees Candle Cove playing suddenly, and dear ole dad comes in to shut it off. Only he isn’t dad anymore, is he? Or is he even alive?


Now we switch back to those few months prior. Marla stumbles onto her son lying in that field. We go back to see that Lily whispered something to her grandmother after getting home safe. And when she rushed out, heading for the field, it was to hold Mike’s airways shut, to suffocate his body in an effort to keep Eddie from returning.
Stuck together, the boys are left in that dreaded place with the Skin Taker, forever to live out their days with only themselves as company. In the real world, Marla goes on knowing that Mike was a good man, and now his daughter has a chance to live a normal life free from the reach of Candle Cove.

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What a fucking fantastic finale! It truly clued the season up nicely, the storyline and its plot weaved nicely together right to the finish. Very happy. Also, super excited to see the next season that’s already done filming, I believe. Looks intense, and judging by this season and its quality we have much to enjoy.

Frontier – Season 1, Episode 2: “Little Brother War”

Discovery’s Frontier
Season 1, Episode 2: “Little Brother War”
Directed by Brad Peyton
Written by Perry Chafe

* For a review of the Pilot, “A Kingdom Unto Itself” – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “Mushkegowuk Esquewu” – click here
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Last we left Michael Smyth (Landon Liboiron), he was in the clutches of Declan Harp (Jason Momoa), at his mercy.
In Montreal, Douglas Brown (Allan Hawco) talks of Samuel Grant (Shawn Doyle), hoping to get him to invest in the ventures of him and his brothers Cedric (Stephen Lord) and Malcolm (Michael Patric). They urgently want to get in on the fur trade, hoping to be “richer than we ever imagined.”
In disputed territory, two young Native men – one a grandson of a prominent indigenous chief named Kitchi (Kiowa Gordon) – play a game of hunter, chasing each other around the woods. Before a couple white men led by Cedric Brown shoot them, catching Kitchi to use for a deal with the tribe. The other boy makes it back to their land warning of the white men wearing the “Red and Blue” on their coloured sashes.
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Back with Michael, and the fairly pathetic Father James Coffin (Christian McKay), he’s tied to a stake and awaiting the decisions of Harp. We discover a little more about Declan: he had a Cree mother and an Irish father. Nothing else matters other than Lord Benton (Alun Armstrong) right now for him. He wants to know what Michael knows of his plans. Of course the younger of the two, tied to that stake, gives up whatever information he can think to share. He also reveals that the woman he loves, Clenna Dolan (Lyla Porter-Follows) would be hanged if he didn’t do what Benton wanted. Then, Harp frees him.
At the Native camp, one of the women advises they must “be patient” and not act yet. But that’s a tough sell for the warriors, wanting not to let the British overtake them completely. Although she advises, they have much to lose in conflict with the Natives.
Grace Emberly (Zoe Boyle) receives a bloodied, thirsty Captain Chesterfield (Evan Jonigkeit) in her establishment. She asks of what happened, though Chesterfield acts ignorant of what went on, more upset at himself than he is lashing out at Grace. She patches him up, offering the Captain a sort of deal: she’ll do what she can to help him become Governor, long as he becomes a business partner. Hmm, now that’s a relationship I want to see more of going forward. Might prove interesting.
On his ship, Lord Benton has Thredwell hung to make a point. He gives a speech about the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Navy being “run ragged by men in canoes.” He thinks nothing of the French, the Scots, and certainly not of the Natives or Harp. He commands “total domination” and the capture of Declan. This Benton is an intensely evil man, he makes his crew swear to Thredwell having killed himself, too.

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Coffin and Smyth keep waiting anxiously for their fates. They’re given a little food by Sokanon (Jessica Matten), a small kindness which Michael appreciates. It’s still not clear exactly what Declan plans on doing with them, even if they’re not tied to a post any longer.
One of Grace’s girls takes her to their storage house, inside is Cedric Brown with Kitchi wounded and bleeding. Not a good situation, for any of them. Luckily Grace takes care of the boy to pull him through. She gets a bit of information about Grant from Cedric, that he’s a money man. This raises her eyebrows significantly.
Meanwhile, Douglas and Malcolm arrive in Grant’s Montreal home. The brothers try to tell the man about their upcoming agreement with the Eastern Cree, however, Grant knows of their debt. They need a large investment. We see the difference in the Brown brothers; looks as if Douglas is the most level headed of the group.
Onto the boat goes Benton’s undercover barmaid Imogen (Diana Bentley), bringing him information on Cedric. Moreover, we get another glimpse of the Lord and his nasty ways, dropping a coin for her to pick up then stepping right on her knuckles. He treats every single person in his way as an object, especially women. Regardless, Benton is ever out to make money, to destroy anyone against him. He sends Chesterfield out to do his bidding, another man of whom I’m not a fan. He goes straight to Grace, angry about Kitchi in her care. Then when Cedric interrupts he’s stabbed deep in the gut by the raging Captain. Oh, shit.
Out in the Cree camp Declan brings items to ingratiate himself to the tribe. Samoset (Zahn McClarnon) watches Michael and Coffin, as Harp heads in to talk with the tribe leader Okimaw. Turns out the gifts Harp brought likewise include the two captives. In a tipi, Declan talks with Okimaw about Kitchi being captured. He promises to track the boy down and headed for Fort James, still with the priest and the kid in tow.


Grace does her best to convince Chesterfield of her Make Him Governor plan. She advises he’ll have to “discredit” Benton in London. They’re playing a tricky game, both of them know this, and Imogen works at her pub. But she is determined, at all costs, to make this work. She’s a tricky lass, I love it. She’s also got her own spy, Mary (Breanne Hill).
Then Harp walks in to speak with Grace, they know one another well. Except they’ve not seen each other in months. He asks her about Kitchi, so she tells him about Brown, and Benton’s men who came later. Furthermore, Grace lets us in on the fact something happened to Declan’s wife, obviously involving Benton. I wonder what dark secret lies there.
The Native boy is kept at the Governor’s House, guarded by men. Benton is there, as well. Declan wants to “slit their throats as they sleep” but the others don’t think it’s wise. Michael wants to use his former position as spy for Benton to simply walk right in. Later, he’ll let the rest inside. Is he on their side, or still with Benton? Samoset and Declan both believe he’s on theirs, and let him go.
Michael meets Benton, who believed he was lost. He’s only curious about Harp. Most of what comes from the kid is half-truths, a bunch of lies. He does his best to conceal anything about the man to Benton, though Michael still worries for Clenna and her safety. The Lord also works to make the young man worry for his own safety around the Cree-Irish rebel. “Do not be seduced by Declan Harp, your own life will be in peril.”
As night falls deeper, Michael sneaks about to find Kitchi’s location. He then alerts Declan and the others. Declan, Samoset, and Michael go together, and the assault begins. They make away with Kitchi, as Samoset winds up gravely wounded. He lays bleeding in Declan’s arms, passing away slowly.
Next morning, Benton surveys the damage. Dead men everywhere, blood in the grass. Simultaneously, Chesterfield is over helping Grace with stolen pelts, just the beginning of their newest business venture. And back on Cree land Kitchi is returned to his grandmother and the tribe, safely. Okimaw assures that Samoset is on the “next stage of his walk” and they all gather to honour the loss of his life. Michael offers his condolences, calling Samoset a kind man – Declan reveals to Smyth they need the Lakewalker tribe in the Cree nation because they’re an army unto themselves.

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Later in the dead of night Michael wakes to noises outside of his tipi. He heads to another where Kitchi lies bloody, throat slit open. When Michael runs back out he’s knocked out by a large, bearded man and carried off into the darkness. Wow, this sets up an exciting next episode.
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Loved this episode more than the first, honestly. A really great follow up that truly makes the rest of the first season look and feel more exciting. Everything was better, from the acting to costumes, to the use of locations. So happy to see a series filmed here in Newfoundland doing well out of the gate.
Next episode is titled “Mushkegowuk Esquewu” and I’m beginning to sense we’ll see more of Declan and the Cree coming together.

Westworld – Season 1, Episode 7: “Trompe L’Oeil”

HBO’s Westworld
Season 1, Episode 7: “Trompe L’Oeil”
Directed by Stephen Williams
Written by Charles Yu

* For a review of the previous episode, “The Adversary” – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “Trace Decay” – click here
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Bernard Lowe (Jeffrey Wright) wakes to the sound of his son’s voice. The boy is ill, his father reading Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland to him doing all the voices. Sadly, followed by his stats dropping. Then Bernie wakes at home in bed by himself. He goes about his day testing robots, asking them questions. He works on Hector Escaton (Rodrigo Santoro) who had a “blacklisted” encounter with a guest. The man wanted to cut off a piece of him and bring it home. This did nothing to change Hector’s worldview. All is well. Except that Elsie Hughes (Shannon Woodward) is nowhere to be found, and will she be found? Or did whoever sneaking up behind her in the dark last episode do something tragic?
Inside Westworld we’re back with William (Jimmi Simpson), Dolores Abernathy (Evan Rachel Wood), and their latest friend Lawrence (Clifton Collins Jr). It’s a tenuous friendship, but they’re together nonetheless. All three of them have reservations, problems. William mentions his friend wanting to see “what was at the end of all this.” Sounds familiar, no? Like somebody we’ve seen searching for The Maze? Either way, soon the trio on their train roll through rough Native territory and they must tread lightly.
It doesn’t take long for Bernie to start worrying about Elsie. He’s got enough going on with Theresa Cullen (Sidse Babett Knudsen), anything else just makes things worse. Of course there are many more concerning things happening around Westworld. I wonder how long Lowe will let his former lover sit unknowing about what he’s found. Perhaps for the best, right now.


Upstairs, Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) bangs Hector, using him as a personal sex toy. She calls a meeting with Theresa. The board is mostly only concerned with the intellectual property at Westworld. Everything outside that is secondary, or nothing at all. “But the godsthey require a blood sacrifice,” Charlotte tells Theresa. The hosts need to be revealed as dangerous. Fuck.
Over at the Mariposa, Maeve Millay (Thandie Newton) continues her days, as usual. Except, not like usual. She is enhanced; more intelligent, more aware. Everything feels off to her. She and Clementine Pennyfeather (Angela Sarafan) have their usual chat, but Maeve sees everything stop, she isn’t shut down like the others. In come a team of men. They’re actually there to take Clementine, so Maeve plays dumb, not moving. Now, this is an interesting little twist. If she isn’t subject to certain commands anymore this could lead to a few tricky situations.
William and Dolores talk on the train. He talks about only ever having books as a boy, getting lost in their imaginary world. He wants to “find out what it means.” Oh, man; is this heading where I think? The clues are all there to make him The Man in Black (Ed Harris), although I can’t see where that whole thread is heading ultimately. Maybe those breadcrumbs are just red herrings. Meanwhile, William must reject Dolores’ advances because he has a wife back home. But that only lasts a minute or two before they fall into each other’s arms.
In one of the labs Dr. Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) and Bernard meet with Charlotte and Theresa. They’ve got things to discuss. So Ms. Hale talks about the recent “reveries” of the certain hosts. In comes Clementine. They say she has issues. Then they have a man beat her, as everyone watches on. She’s reset and everyone repeated. Only the next time she’s attacked Clementine fights back, brutally. Kicking the shit out of her abuser. Hmm. They send Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth) in to take care of the renegade host, but she won’t stop on command. Until Stubbs puts a bullet in her heart. Therefore, Theresa and Charlotte use this as ammunition to fire Lowe, as he won’t speak against Ford. Oh, the doctor doesn’t like that. Not one bit.

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Dolores tells William she’s “not a key” and that she can’t unlock anything for him. That’s all in his own mind. He feels a bit lost now all of a sudden in the whole appeal of Westworld. I’m still unable to shake the idea that he and Black may be one in the same; not sure, not yet, there is just a strong parallel between William in this episode and stuff we’ve heard from the Man in Black. Eventually the train stops, though. Lawrence sees the Confederados have them in the sights of their machine gun. And the bullets start flying.
While the trio of buddies fight off the Confederados they wind up in Ghost Nation territory, where the Confederados get slaughtered in bloody fashion. Letting Dolores, Lawrence, and William ride off literally into the sunset, though the new lovers part on their own course soon enough.
When Maeve is out in the lab again she asks the friendly technician to find out where they took Clementine. She’s up in the Body Shop. They discover her being worked on, lobotomised. Maeve has her two bumbling technicians under a thumb: “At first I thought you and the others were gods. Then I realised, youre just men. And I know men.” Now she wants out. Or else people start dying.
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At the same time Bernie confronts Theresa about “human intervention in the code” concerning the demonstration earlier. Moreover, he also feels there’s something wrong, worth sharing with her. He brings Theresa out where Ford’s little memory house sits in a corner of the park. There, they head downstairs to another lab where hosts are built where hosts are rendered. Theresa finds the blueprint for several hosts, including Robert, Dolores, as well as one that looks strikingly similar to Bernard. Then Ford comes upon the two in his hidden basement. “Youre a fucking monster,” Theresa tells him.
All is clear. Jesus. WOW, I never once guessed. That’s why there are only memories of his previous life – his boy, his life as a  father. Oh my god. A moment of true devastation. Ford sees it otherwise. The hosts are free; under his hand. He ordered Bernie to bring Theresa there, to kill her. One problem solved for the now very terrifying doctor.


What a quality bit of writing. I’d honestly never considered this possibility, I can only imagine what else Westworld has in store for us. The twists and turns are there, waiting to unfold. Ought to be quite intriguing where this all heads next.
The following episode is titled “Trace Decay” – what will be revealed?

The Exorcist – Season 1, Chapter Seven: “Father of Lies”

FOX’s The Exorcist
Season 1, Episode 7: “Father of Lies”
Directed by Tinge Krishnan
Written by Charise Castro Smith

* For a review of Chapter Six, “Star of the Morning” – click here
* For a review of Chapter Eight, “The Griefbearers” – click here
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Possession has gripped Chicago.
At a Roman Catholic Church service, Angela and Henry Rance (Geena Davis & Alan Ruck), their daughter Kat (Brianne Howey), many people are gathered. Father Tomas Ortega (Alfonso Herrera) is leading everyone, praying for Casey Rance’s (Hannah Kasulka) safe return to her family.
Nine days prior, Father Tomas rushes Father Marcus Keane (Ben Daniels) and a horrifically unwell Casey to see Mother Bernadette (Deanna Dunagan). The girl is obviously close to being “integrated” with the demon inside her. All the same, it looks like Fathers Marcus and Tomas are on the same page. Right now they have to keep Pazuzu at bay. He wants revenge.
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The media circus surrounding the Rance family and grandma Chris MacNeil (Sharon Gless). Sounds as if Chris is taking her role in the family more seriously, regretting the past and what she did to their family using Regan’s plight for financial gain.
Bernadette worries if they can’t beat the demon they’ll be unleashing an “ancient violence into the world.” For his part, Marcus has more faith than anybody. Ironic, no? The man who’s been excommunicated wants to fight the forces against God the most.
With the creepiness going on in the upper echelons involving Maria Walters (Kirsten Fitzgerald), the police superintendent, the priest with whom Father Tomas meets, there’s no telling what might happen next. One thing is made perfectly clear: Marcus is an enemy of the Church. That means many things at the moment.
The Rances and Chris give an interview concerning Casey. Naturally, the past tries to emerge. Right away things go sour. The interviewer goes hard at them until Angela and Henry walk out. Instead of solely trying to find the girl, the media wants to dig up dirt first. Typical of certain news outlets. At the same time Casey’s being exorcised, or at least the trio of exorcists – Tomas, Marcus, and Bernadette – try doing the job. Tomas walks away with a bite, and Pazuzu smiles from inside Casey; almost loving the exorcism. So damn creepy. Moreover, Marcus feels responsible now for Casey, after the end of last episode when he nearly expelled the demon for good.
Outside of the Rance house people are holding up signs, some hateful Westboro Baptist Church-like and other more Gothic. A woman confronts Angela about Casey having killed her husband in the ambulance, calling her daughter “demon girl.” Henry quickly rushes his wife back inside.

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Father Bennett (Kurt Egyiawan) has to deal with all those crooked weirdos, including one of the ring leaders Brother Simon (Francis Guinan). He’s come up with a bit of dirt on the finances of those involved with the Papal Planning Committee. Oh, this is all too ominous! I’m worried for Bennett. I like him a lot, and worry his time is drawing to a close. Hopefully he proves me wrong. Seeing all those kooks around him is chilling.
At the house, Chris mentions to Father Tomas he reminds her of one of the priests who helped Regan; she’s talking about Father Damien Karras. Well, Tomas does his best in comforting Angela and her family. He has “faith,” but Angela particularly isn’t convinced. Having a demon come back for her four decades after the first possession, now for her daughter? I’d probably not be too hopeful about God, either. Meanwhile, Casey’s body is withering. And that nasty bastard Pazuzu, he’s hiding. There are literal maggots eating the girl alive, worming through her flesh. If they can’t draw Pazuzu out, they can’t finish the exorcism. If they can’t finish the exorcism, the girl dies. Even worse Bernadette feels that the case is a lost cause, and that perhaps Marcus holding on so dearly, fighting so hard might no longer be about her; is he fighting because of his own past, or does he still genuinely believe? I’m inclined to say the latter.
Angela and her mother talk seriously for the first time in a long while. Chris tells her daughter she’s a good mother. Even the girl formerly known as Regan admits that growing up in the lap of celebrity wasn’t always so bad. Further than that, she understands now how hard it had to be for Chris to watch her be possessed, virtually helpless.
Back with Casey, Father Marcus tries using love to cast out the “Star of the Morning” (but isn’t the demon itself Pazuzu from when it possessed Regan? Little confused on that one now) and make it understand it is forgiven. The girl comes to a moment, crying: “No more.”


The ever diligent Father Bennett finds himself in a precarious position, snooping around looking for clues. He locates the burned ashes of the organs used in the Ceremony of Ash, Vocare Pulvere. He’s also being watched, by one of the possessed homeless men. When he comes across a room full of dead, bloodied corpses, some of the possessed men attack. He manages to fend them off, then starts killing demons like a bad motherfucker. YES! YES! This must continue. We need more Bennett in our lives.
Tomas is slipping further from the faith, as he’s in bed with Jessica (Mouzam Makkar) and shirking those vows he took; not that I agree with his vows, but still. Although it’s not exactly as if he’s easily doing it, the whole situation evidently weighs heavy on his soul. She can tell. We can tell. He winds up going out to try getting something for his bite and gets punched in the face by a pharmacy customer. Maria bails him out. That ain’t good. She acts as a shoulder to cry on. But maybe, after being passed over for demonic possession, she’ll have a change of heart? Yeah, right.
Things at the Rance house are rough. Angela’s breaking down. She asks to have Father Tomas come over, her mind is frantic, her speech, too. She believes that Casey’s dead. “Part of me is gone,” she tells Tomas, her husband, Kat, Chris, each of them watching with a deep sadness in their eyes.


Marcus is about to administer a cup of belladonna tea to Casey when he realises “This is his design; I will not interfere.” He won’t give up on her. His faith is so pure that there’s no stopping him. And likewise, Angela isn’t giving up. Tomas brings her in and from the moment Pazuzu senses her, he comes alive once more. He is drawn out.
A sow,” the demon says looking at the woman he once knew as Regan. It is time for a brutal battle between the one who got away and that ancient evil, Pazuzu.


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What a fascinating and well-written episode! Another of my favourites, I think. There is so much depth to these characters, I can’t even imagine where to begin on that. Also, side note: the score is fucking incredible, that piano riff we hear that plays off the intro song. I mean, I honestly feel this series surprised me, many of us. It is leagues better than I ever hoped.
Let’s get geared up for Chapter Eight “The Griefbearers” next week. And how will the showdown between the demon and Regan MacNeil go? I wonder.

Channel Zero – Candle Cove, Episode 5: “Guest of Honor”

SyFy’s Channel Zero
Season 1, Episode 5: “Guest of Honor”
Directed by Craig William Macneill
Written by Katie Gruel & Mallory Westfall

* For a review of the previous episode, “A Strange Vessel” – click here
* For a review of the finale, “Welcome Home” – click here
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With Jessica (Natalie Brown) face down in a kiddie pool, stabbed to death… by kids… Amy Welch (Luisa D’Oliveira) must deal with the fallout. The scene is gruesome, even for someone in law enforcement to see. What I dig about this scenario is that the writers aren’t afraid to make characters expendable. And certainly with only this and another episode left there’s a sense of urgency, in all manners of speaking.
Mike Painter (Paul Schneider) is back at his mother Marla’s (Fiona Shaw) with his daughter Lily (Abigail Pniowsky). He’s having a little tooth problem, too. But the news about Jessica comes and devastates him. Amy lets him know about Mrs. Francis Booth (Marina Stephenson Kerr), the kids. They found props from Candle Cove in her basement. This is nearly too much for Mike to handle hearing. That tooth pain again makes him cringe. Due to the fact there’s a new tooth seemingly pushing down from out of the top of his gums. Like a fang. He doesn’t bother with a dentist. No, Mike tries pulling it out instead. Just as his wife Erica (Kristen Harris) arrives. Naturally she’s weirded out about how Lily got there. Maybe it’s best if she just gets the hell out of and away from Iron Hill.
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At the station nobody’s buying the Mrs. Booth story. They don’t get it yet. Children murdered under her command, and so much more. Mike tries to say his piece, but ultimately it’s Amy who professionally has had to step up. She makes the call to start searching for these kids. They’ve got to find them. Meanwhile, Mike feels a bit thirsty to get over and see the Candle Cove artefacts. He suggests getting Gary Yolen (Shaun Benson) back on things, to escort him to the crime scene. Not sure if that’s smart. Yet there they go, Gary and Mike; the two unsuspecting partners. Poor fucking Gary. He’s lost his wife, lost everything. Poor Jessica, dying so young, so brutal. Outside Gary finds teeth left on a garden post. Downstairs the remnants of Candle Cove awaited Mike. This is a sort of watershed moment in his life because he’s finally figuring out that the television show was real, that he wasn’t crazy, after all these years. Then there’s Francis. She calls her house where Mike answers, saying: “I have so much to tell you
We flash back to a younger Mrs. Booth. Her son Jacob and Eddie Painter witness one of her seizures. We see something spooky in Eddie, as he stops the woman’s epileptic fit, commanding her to get up. What sort of power did he have? Where did it come from? In the present, Mike makes a deal to go talk with Francis alone. At the very same time more children are being called by that creepy television show, summoned to do its bidding. To prepare the plank for others to head for the supposed real cove. Even little Katie Yolen is gone from the hospital, she and her brother Dane.
The sudden missing kids start a panic at the station, and Amy does the only thing she can, getting Deputy Simon Grove (Bruce Novakowski) to “find Mike Painter.” The man himself, he’s busy trying to meet with Francis. Once Simon gets there the terrifying little kids are scuttling around in the nearby field, and Mike goes inside to find the old woman. Simon ends up meeting the person in the skeleton costume, as the kids hold him to be murdered. Before passing out Mike sees Francis take off the skull mask in the distance.
And on the way out of town Erica, with Lily in tow, nearly fly off the road due to the pack of kids in front of them.

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Amy comes across Candle Cove screensavers all over the station. Another creepy image to add to the pile. Another one? When Mike wakes to Simon’s cut throat, Francis in her costume again; with Lily in her grasp. Not to mention the only remaining Painter twin is hooked to wires, strung up overhead, as if a living marionette doll. But then he wakes, in the grass again. Erica and Lily are in a motel room, safe. For now.
Out of nowhere Marla sees that Francis Booth is now in her kitchen. She wants to talk to Mike. The three of them sit around and chat. They have things to catch up on. “Tell me about Candle Cove,” Mike asks of Francis. She talks of life changing moments, life altering people, purpose. That sorta thing. When Eddie showed her the power in him, her life changed drastically. Furthermore, she claims he’s the one that created the show. “You thought Candle Cove found him. What he had was always there. He was born with it. Hes the light; the beacon. He always was,” Mrs. Booth rambles. Supposedly, she says the dead twin is coming back. Uhh… what now? Either way, just as I suspected Eddie required sacrifices. For the cove. Little Jacob was fed to those otherworldly powers. Francis claims Mike was also born with something special, just like Eddie. One thing’s for sure, he has horrifyingly real nightmares.
At this point his daughter’s seeing scary visions of Candle Cove. Even the Tooth-Child is hanging around her room at night, lurking at the edge of the bed. It lures Lily, closer, closer. Simultaneously, out in a trailer amongst the woods Francis tells her children of the night: “Hell be here soon.” And is it Eddie she speaks of?

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When Mike finally pulls that extra tooth out of his head, everything gets a bit strange; I mean, stranger. On the television Lily shows up. In Candle Cove. Standing terrified in the mouth of the cove’s yawning cave.

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This set the stage for a great, scary finale! Can’t wait to see “Welcome Home” and find out the last remaining secrets of Candle Cove. Loved this series, from the start. Anticipating an exciting and disturbing finale. Also have a hard time containing my excitement, and need, for the second season. Should be a trip.

Discovery’s Frontier – Pilot: Capitalism, Colonialism, Blood; Oh, My!

Discovery’s Frontier
Season 1, Episode 1: “Pilot”
Directed by Brad Peyton
Written by Peter Blackie, Rob Blackie, & Perry Chafe

* For a review of the next episode, “Little Brother War” – click here
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In the world of fur trading, we start in disputed territory where things have gone violent and bloody. A man named Declan Harp (Jason Momoa) is seeing to it that those on that land, land which doesn’t belong to them, feel his wrath. He’s sending a message to the British: this is war.
In London, at the Hudson’s Bay Company, Lord Benton (Alun Armstrong) is getting report from Captain Chesterfield (Evan Jonigkeit) about what Harp has done. We also discover Declan is half-Native, half-Irish. Seems Chesterfield is a bit of a cocky fellow, hoping to rush in and take care of the man. But Benton is smarter, knowing Declan could be a much bigger problem than just a little bit of rebellion. He wants to use the rebel leader an “example.”
Around Gravesend Pier a few thieves are trying to keep themselves in food, hoping to survive, and not sure how long they will. They soon set their sights on a ship full of redcoats. They want to steal a bit of gunpowder to hawk off, make a handful of coin.
Along a river in disputed territory, Harp finds Jean-Marc Rivard (Paul Fauteux). They’ve got dealings together, each of them fairly skilled in the art of business. Harp is trying to get a meeting with Samuel Grant (Shawn Doyle). Although Rivard tells him the furs they’ve been given so far aren’t enough. Declan says he’s going to make a deal with the Cree. Hmm. Is that wishful thinking on his part?


The thieves – Michael Smyth (Landon Liboiron) and Clenna Dolan (Breanne Hill) – sneak onto the boat for the gunpowder in the night. They’re crafty, this crew. Michael warns Clenna to be careful with handling it or “the last thing thatll go through your mindll be your arse.” On deck, they’re headed off by a couple of men, and their friend is stabbed to death, thrown overboard. Clenna makes off into the dark, as Michael does his best to weasel a way to safety; for the time being he stows away below deck. Doesn’t help when the ship is off to sea and he’s just waking up. Fuck sakes, Mikey. That is the last place you want to be. Not even like they’re close to shore, either. Right out on the open ocean. Let’s hope he is crafty enough to get himself out of there safely. As for Clenna, she’s been caught and locked away.
Grace Emberly (Zoe Boyle) tends bar at a tavern. She knows quite a few people. One man has no money for drink, so he trades a few secrets on the HBC for a glass. Good Christ, the stuff she has to endure. A drunk governor rambles on about Lord Benton and there’s talk of him coming over to bring his own wrath to Declan Harp. However, Grace puts it in perspective: “What he brings is opportunity.”
Eventually Michael’s found below deck. Before he gets tossed overboard, Lord Benton gives him a chance to redeem himself. When what he tells the Lord is true Benton kills another man in front of everybody. Then puts a ring back on his bloody hand. One ruthless bastard. Michael winds up getting a spot on the boat, though surely he’ll have to make himself of use. Chesterfield meets with Benton later, they talk about the competition “choking off” their fur trade endeavours. They set their sights on Harp as a demonstration of power. To snuff out any further competition. Benton tasks Smyth with tracking down Declan, reaching out via their similar Irish blood. To take the deal Michael wants Clenna released and his charges dropped. But is he going to like making this deal with the devil down the road? I think not. I guarantee that.
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Samuel Grant receives a greeting from Rivard. The fairly fancy Grant is trying on a sealskin coat. His trapper friend requests him to a meeting with Harp. Doesn’t seem like the man is interested. Rivard all but begs him. Of course Declan’s reputation precedes him. What we’re seeing here are the various power struggles, so many people rushing to capitalism that there is a struggle to climb to the top. In the end, Grant agrees to a meeting. Only if the notorious man comes to him in Montreal.
At Fort James – far as I can tell, this fort was located in disputed territory somewhere between Quebec and New Brunswick, likely closer to the latter (see here) – Michael winds up in a predicament when a redcoat is murdered. Father Coffin (Christian McKay) helps him on a whim and gets him away from a bit of trouble. The priest claims himself as the guide Smyth is seeking. Coffin reluctantly says he’ll take him to Harp. Eventually, anyways. I get the feeling Coffin’s a greasy con artist. And he is, indeed!
On Benton’s ship Grace goes to see the Lord. She sets the record straight on Michael not having anything to do with the murder earlier. She also tries to ingratiate herself to the Lord, make things easier for herself. She winds up taking a maid named Imogen (Diana Bentley) on to help at the tavern; the “eyes and ears” for Benton, like you could’ve guessed.
Chesterfield goes to the tavern and questions a barmaid named Mary (Breanne Hill) about Michael, under the eye of Grace. But that isn’t much help. This Chesterfield is a rotten bastard. Even chokes Mary, at least until Grace pulls a blade on him.


Out amongst the woods Coffin leads Michael towards wherever they’ll find Harp. The younger man reveals to the supposed priest he “has no choice” except go forward and meet the fur trader. Oh, if only the redcoats didn’t find them. Or perhaps that isn’t the case. Coffin probably wasn’t going to take him to the right place; the con artist thing and all. So the two are held captive. That night Natives led by Sokanon (Jessica Matten) attack the camp, killing the redcoats. They whisk Coffin and Mike away.
Trekking through the woods they work their way across the a river to a camp inland. There, they meet Harp; he’s covered in blood, having worked on an animal recently, doing a bit of skinning. Michael admits to looking for Declan, yet the man himself doesn’t believe that. Most of all nobody is impressed with the priest.
And young Mike Smyth has a choice: give up information on Lord Benton, or “join the priest.” Death is around the corner. Just depends on how much.

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Not all of this first episode impressed me. Enough of it did that I’m excited to see the second episode now. Some of this was shot in my home province of Newfoundland, so it’s nice to see our locations on display. Both Momoa and Liboiron have me interested already. Very much looking forward to what they’ll do respectively and together.
The following episode is titled “Little Brother War” and I’m hoping there’ll be a good bit of action to get us going hard into the rest of the season. Here’s to more Frontier!

Westworld – Season 1, Episode 6: “The Adversary”

HBO’s Westworld
Season 1, Episode 6: “The Adversary”
Directed by Frederick E.O. Toye
Written by Halley Gross & Jonathan Nolan

* For a review of the previous episode, “Contrapasso” – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “Trompe L’Oeil” – click here
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Maeve Millay (Thandie Newton) is honestly my favourite character in this entire series. He struggle comes as intense; this episode is no change. She walks through a day not noticing men shot around her, not noticing all the horror of Sweetwater. “Fake Plastic Trees” by Radiohead plays on the player piano in the saloon. Maeve and Clementine Pennyfeather (Angela Sarafyan) talk their dialogue, they drink their drinks, they go about the programmed day, as “newcomer” guests show up for their various adventures and paid storylines. When Maeve takes one of them upstairs for a romp in the sack, taunting him when he’s unable to please her. She puts his hand around her throat though, and it’s a different story. She welcomes it, wanting to die. All to wake up out on the table in the lab, the technician in front of her.
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At the same time, Elsie  Hughes (Shannon Woodward) talks with Bernard Lowe (Jeffrey Wright) about her recent discovery. The hosts at Westworld are being used for “industrial espionage” and now things are getting dicey. Seems that the host who went berserk on Elsie is an older model. However, this requires Bernie to head downstairs – Floor B82, strictly confidential with tight security. It’s a sketchy-looking place, shaking lights, old computer systems. Lowe gets into things comparing data to find an anomaly. Not only that, there are others. Hosts which “arent registered with the new system.” So what exactly are they all doing? And how long until something worse than what happened with Elsie happens?
Dr. Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) freezes the little Mexican town, having a gawk at his real estate and planning for new, big things. A simple “carry on” and everything gets moving again; an entire world built on his command. He notices the carving of a maze on a table nearby. Cut to his office, full of host faces and all kinds of interesting little things. Ford has a sketchbook, containing lots of drawings, including one that looks to be who I assume is Dolores Abernathy (Evan Rachel Wood), as well as a house, his church, so on.
But most importantly? The maze.
Elsewhere, The Man in Black (Ed Harris) rides with Teddy Flood (James Marsden). The latter tells his new buddy about the maze being a Native American myth, involving a man who can’t seem to die that eventually builds a maze only he can solve. Interesting; sound like somebody? Poor Teddy only wants to find Dolores.

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The technician talks with Maeve about her character, what she was made to do as a host. He tells her there’s a distinction between being “born” and being “made” and that there’s also little recognisable difference between humans and hosts. Except hosts are terribly smart. When they’re controlled. What I dig is that Maeve seems outside of that control, somehow. The technician pairs his device with her to show the process of what she’s said, the way the program assigns her dialogue, shows her entire thought process and where improvisation happens. Then suddenly it overloads her mind and it looks like there is trouble. After a bit of programming he brings Maeve back. Problem is she wants to see what’s outside the lab. She witnesses the entire operation, the washing of the bloody host corpses, the moulds of the hosts being created and pumped full of blood, the skin coming alive; a truly gorgeous sequence yet sad in tone. Amazing stuff. We, alongside Maeve, get to see the animals created, life made at the hands of technicians and other robotics. Then further on are the simulations where hosts are programmed to their specific roles. What Maeve sees is her literal entire existence fabricated before her eyes. After she witnesses a commercial, seeing herself there onscreen, they head back downstairs. How will this ultimately affect her? Will she remember more? Well, right now she winds up taking hostage the other technician who shows up threatening to bring his colleague to QA. She… changes his mind.
Theresa Cullen (Sidse Babett Knudsen) brings Bernard to the attention of Dr. Ford knowing they’re together. She decides their “indiscretion” is finished. She accuses him of an inability of being impartial, with everybody including Ford. Sort of cold. Brings to mind the idea of the difference between human beings and the hosts: the hosts are a lot less cruel, even the worst of them, than the humans. I feel like Theresa is someone that’ll go off the rails soon enough. She feels highly reactionary as a person. We’ll have to wait and see. She goes to see Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman), who’s on leave, complaining about Dr. Ford and his latest work which has displaced hosts. There’s venom in Theresa, as she doesn’t make any better friends with anyone, continually fighting to stay at the top. What’s she going to do to stay there?


Back with Black and Teddy, they’re on the search to locate Wyatt. They use a couple soldier uniforms and pass through a camp, where Wyatt’s left his bloody mark. Along the way someone recognises Mr. Flood and pulls a gun. This turns into a nasty situation for the pair of gunslingers, even Black can’t hold off that many soldiers.
Lee lounges and meets a woman. After a bit of chat she questions him about “control” and he, in a drunken state, goes off about the whole thing being a “vanity project.” The bar cuts him off by request of Ms. Cullen. I feel like that lady at the bar will turn up again.
Elsie wants Bernie to keep helping her with heading off the espionage happening with the hosts. She wants to use the whole thing to get herself ahead. I feel for Lowe. He seems to be consistently stuck between a rock and a hard place. He heads in to a place labelled Sector 17, full of trees and fields. He soon tracks down a house where he sees a man picking up a pile of wood from out front. Inside, he comes across a man and his family. He can’t seem to control these robots, either. They only respond to Dr. Ford, who shows up quickly. “Survivors of the wreck of time,” he tells Bernie; they are “first generation hosts“. Ford gives his friend a tour around the robotics, which is pretty damn awesome visually. This was a vision built by Arnold, one from the memories of Ford’s childhood. Something the doctor worked on over the years. And all of it makes Lowe wonder. But can’t he understand? Surely he can, someone in a way seeking methods to reignite the past. Maybe seeing those things in another person makes him realise how foolish and possibly dangerous they can become. This all sends Lowe on a quest to find out the names of first generation hosts out there.
Teddy’s about to get branded. He remembers himself walking through a town with Wyatt, killing everyone in sight. Then he and Black make their escape. Teddy ends up on the machine gun, again killing everyone in sight. He makes The Man in Black look like a kitten: “You think you know someone.”
There’s espionage going on from within. Elsie reports to Lowe, and he starts worrying about her safety. Uh oh. I like her a lot, she’s smart. That probably means nothing good, for her. Looks as if the high tech futuristic technology can be undercut by older, less traceable technology from previous systems. And who’s the culprit? Is Theresa behind it, or somebody else entirely? Elsie traces a signal to find a relay setup by whoever’s doing the spying. It takes her to a musty old room filled with artefacts from other stories Westworld likely tried once upon a time. There she manages to open a box where the relay provides her – hopefully – good information.
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Bernard goes to see Theresa about some of the things he’s stumbled upon. He tells her about his doubts re: Ford. He gets a call from Elsie, confirming Theresa as the spy. Ah, I fucking knew it! I knew it! But I’m concerned for Bernard.
With the technicians, Maeve tries to make a couple changes to her character makeup. The greasy technician tries talking her out of it, but she’s aware of other options due to her new relationship with the other technician. She does get her “alterations” and I’m quite interested in what’s about to happen next. The technicians see there’s somebody else already making changes to Maeve. Someone higher up. Nevertheless she convinces the technicians to make her more perceptive, less receptive to pain. Oh, my.
More info from Elsie. It isn’t only Theresa. Someone else is retasking hosts, old models specifically. Big time modifications to “prime directives” that could possibly allow violence from hosts against guest. Who does she believe did it all? Arnold. Motherfucking Arnold. How’s that possible?
In a lab Ford has the young boy from his host fantasy world answering questions. It’s, in fact as I’d imagined, a young version of himself. Little Robert. He killed an animal, which disturbs the older version. “A voice” told him to do it. It was Arnold.
Just as I suspected, Elsie finds further and probably damning evidence. Yet someone’s lurking in the shadows, now they’ve got her.

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This was another solid episode. Plenty of intrigue that I find exciting, plus they’re never giving up too much. Bits and pieces with every chapter. Next is titled “Trompe L’Oeil” and it’ll be of interest to see particularly what goes down when Maeve heads back into Sweetwater all pumped up. Yowzahs.

Channel Zero – Candle Cove, Episode 4: “A Strange Vessel”

SyFy’s Channel Zero
Season 1, Episode 4: “A Strange Vessel”
Directed by Craig William Macneill
Written by Erica Saleh

* For a review of the previous episode, “Want to See Something Cool?” – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “Guest of Honor” – click here
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With Mike Painter’s (Paul Schneider) daughter Lily (Abigail Pniowsky) at his mother’s step in Iron Hill, will we discover more secrets behind his childhood? In 1988, Mike and Jessica talking about Eddie, the kids starting to go missing. Then Mike shows her a Pirate Percy doll his brother made recently. No sooner does Candle Cove come on, the skull-headed figure announcing: “Do you sense it? Something is coming. A strange vessel is headed for the cove!”
In the present day Mike tries to figure out how his daughter got all the way back to his hometown, at grandma Marla’s (Fiona Shaw). Lily’s spaced out, no answers for her father. But you know that deep down Mike understands this connects with Eddie, the other missing and dead children. And maybe Marla understands that, too.
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Standing in the hallway of the hospital Jessica (Natalie Brown) can clearly see there are multiple children all witnessing strange things. Candle Cove characters appear all over the wall in kids’ drawings. At least Jessica’s kids are making up. Uh oh – she also notices her boy Dane is missing a tooth. That’s because Katie has it, and the grin across her face as she looks at it is disturbing.
While Mike tries to explain to his wife their daughter showed up in Iron Hill, Jessica goes to see her husband, Sheriff Gary (Shaun Benson), as he sits behind bars. I mean, he fucked up. He’s still convinced Mike is dangerous, advising his wife to go home and get his gun, to keep it close. Just in case. However, husband Gary isn’t aware that his wife’s reconnected online with Mike as of late, before his breakdown and his trip home.
Amy Welch (Luisa D’Oliveira) is busy running things at the station, between actual work and turning down a fellow officer’s sort of sweet advances. I hope to see more of her. It’ll be nice to have her take on a bigger role at work because of Gary’s situation.
Switch back to ’88. Jessica doesn’t particularly like Eddie much, preferring Mike’s company. Especially seeing as how Eddie went pretty weird after watching too much Candle Cove. In the present Jessica meets Lily, who’s still pretty spacey. When she asks the little girl what she likes, Lily replies: “I like pirates.” Oh, for fuck sakes! Then, in the wall of the living room, she pulls out the Pirate Percy doll. She also says she isn’t Lily. Her doctor dad tries to do his thing, analysing; is Lily channelling the spirit of her dead uncle Eddie? Speaking of, we go back to ’88 again when he tells Mike about how every time they send somebody off to Candle Cove, “it gets stronger” – the Tooth Child? Regardless, there was a division between the brothers, and clearly Eddie felt that slipping, worried his brother would love a girl more than him. Tragic, really, as well as part of growing up, figuring life out.

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We get a strange reenactment in the shadows, what looks like kids wearing papier-mâché replicas of the Candle Cove characters. Then there’s an amazing matching shot of young Mike and Eddie playing cards, which then cuts to Mike playing cards with his daughter; more evidence of the fact she’s channelling uncle Ed. Also, a terrifying figure lurks in the shadows as father and daughter/brother play. What is it? A pirate?
Only problem with the whole channelling dead Eddie thing is that it really gets to Marla. She’s a good woman, whose family was just torn right open. Mike has been immersed in this weirdness his entire life, or most of it; she’s only been experiencing the truth behind everything recently. And she doesn’t know exactly how to handle all those emotions. Hopefully she’ll be able to keep it together. At the same time, Mike talks to his brother through Lily; about his murder. Basically Eddie’s soul needs to get put to rest. Until then Lily ain’t Lily.
Those creepy mask wearing kids are no doubt those crazies Mrs. Booth has been training. Deputy Welch winds up talking to the old teacher, worried about what she saw them doing recently by the roadside – stabbing the shit out of a mannequin. They speak a bit of ’88, Jacob… then we’re back to that time once more, as Eddie goes to see Jacob Booth. Oh, my. I can see it coming now. Candle Cove comes on. Mother hugs her son Jacob tight, kissing him with tears in her eyes. Is she doing what I think she’s doing?
Eddie once tricked Jessica and tried sending her to Candle Cove. So brother confronts brother. Eventually, Mike gets the upper hand by pulling back those injured fingers on Eddie’s hand and running off. Present day once more, there are other nasty children skulking about. Amy tries to track down those kids at the school only to stumble into a darkened room where computer screens with Candle Cove screensavers pop up. On she goes to the gym where the mask wearers shout “Protect the ship” before Amy interrupts. Jesus, these kids are creepy.

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Mike and Jessica go the morgue where Eddie’s body lies shelved. They’re taking the next necessary step to try returning Lily to normal. They burn his remains out in the woods. Simultaneously, grandma can’t seem to keep her eyes off her granddaughter, the spirit of her dead son looking back. If all this works, that spirit will be gone soon enough. Good, and sad in a way for Marla.
In other parts of Iron Hill bad things are on their way. Deputy Welch is at home with her Chinese food, the friendly law enforcement suitor from earlier in bed next to her. Little does she know there are awful kids coming for her. In a last minute move she heads over to see Mrs. Booth. No answer. So Amy finds the spare key and lets herself in. Noises lead her down to the basement. There she finds unpleasant jars, a Candle Cove doll, a dead Daphne being feasted on by a cat. GET OUT, AMY!
It seems the masked kids didn’t go to see the deputy after all. Jessica discovers them in her home, wielding knives. They start stabbing her, so she pulls the gun. But who could kill a kid, right? This sends her outside, as the kids crowd her in the little pool and stab her repeatedly under the watchful eye of Mrs. Booth.
Later in the night Lily wakes. She’s herself again, finally. Although she doesn’t remember a single thing. It was all a “nightmare” her father says. But the nightmare’s just beginning.

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What a savage episode. This one frayed my nerves, genuine fright a couple times. There’s just this true sense of dread and suspense. I never expected Jessica to come across those kids. That really threw me for a complete loop.
Next episode is titled “Guest of Honor” and I’m in awe trying to think of what they’ll do next on this series. Love this show. Give me another 5 seasons, right now. So many great, classic Creepypastas they could use.

Westworld – Season 1, Episode 5: “Contrapasso”

HBO’s Westworld
Season 1, Episode 5: “Contrapasso”
Directed by Jonny Campbell
Story by Dominic Mitchell & Lisa Joy

* For a review of the previous episode, “Dissonance Theory” – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “The Adversary” – click here
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Another chat between Dr. Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) and that cowboy, Old Bill (Michael Wincott), one of the oldest in the park, as the doctor tells him about the saddest thing he’d ever seen. A story about a dog and a cat, the latter being torn “to pieces” by the former. It’s really an allegory for humanity, or the pursuit of greatness by those who aren’t sure what they’ll do with it when they find it. They may just grab hold and hang on too hard until there’s nothing left.
Dolores Abernathy (Evan Rachel Wood) gradually moves from the path of her narrative with each passing episode. She finds herself still with William (Jimmi Simpson) and his buddy Logan (Ben Barnes), though her mind wanders. They make it into a nearby town full of all degenerate sorts, apparently. Logan talks about their company and some of the stuff outside Sweetwater. For his part, William doesn’t dig this town: “Whoever designed this place, you get the feeling they dont think very much of people.” Mercenaries arrive, we discover this all a part of a bigger game of war. Hmm. Sinister, or exciting? Or both?
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The Man in Black (Ed Harris) is busy still hauling Lawrence (Clifton Collins Jr.) about, saying he’s on the hunt for the “big bad wolf.” He’s also got Teddy Flood (James Marsden) in tow, having saved him awhile back. Black mentions a friend of his, whomever that could possibly be, always say there’s a path for everybody; remember that, could be significant at some point, maybe. Meanwhile, the young boy who’d been talking to Dr. Ford at one time happens upon the group, being sent to fetch water for them. Because right now Lawrence is getting his throat slit. Not a nice sight for sweet English boys’ eyes. Considering Black drains Lawrence’s blood into his water pouch.
Outside, a couple technicians are checking out Maeve Millay (Thandie Newton) again after her recent shootout. They notice her incision, as somebody were looking for something specific. Will they catch on?
All that blood was a makeshift transfusion for Teddy, to bring him back up to speed. Then he talks about how the humanity of the hosts is “cost effective” and laments how things were once upon a time. He mentions Dolores, too. He says a few fellas made off with her, and that gets Teddy on his feet again.
And what of Dolores? She keeps having flashbacks, seeing those corpses littered everywhere around her. William keeps her mind off things, but I keep wondering how much longer until she starts making connections like Maeve. Right now she talks about hoping for her life to change. When he talks of the real world, it doesn’t just roll off Dolores. She notices, and it sort of shakes William a bit. When a Day of the Dead parade comes through town Dolores sees a vision of herself in its crowd. Before passing out. When she’s brought out by Dr. Ford “in a dream,” a.k.a in a lab, they have a short talk. He speaks of Arnold, the one who created her so many years ago. That’s the voice she keeps hearing in her little daydreams, calling to come find him. Turns out Arnold had wanted her to help bring Westworld down. But Ford tries to make sure Dolores’ world is only heroes and villains, a black-and-white dichotomy instead of anything too complex. In the dark though, she still speaks to somebody: is it Arnold?

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One of the technicians who worked on Maeve is doing some kind of experiments with a bird. He wants to be a coder, but his partner tells him he’ll only ever be a “butcher.”
Back with William and Logan they come across a reincarnated Lawrence. Ahh, very interesting! Suddenly, Dolores starts making deals. She helps get Logan and William in with Lawrence on a job with the Confederados to get hold of some explosives. Regarding Lawrence, this doesn’t mean anything re: The Man in Black & William, because the timelines aren’t made positively clear. It’s suggestive, no doubt. Nothing definitive still. Anyways, the gang get their latest adventure kicked off, confronting a wagon. Things start off fine then get incredibly tense, a gunfight erupting with a bunch of hosts getting shot. They make out well, obviously, though William doesn’t seem to take much joy, if any, in killing. Regardless if it’s fake.
Elsie Hughes (Shannon Woodward) is working with a host who’s got more dick than brains. Literally. She happens to see the host that tried killing her being brought for disposal. Elsie ends up catching a technician on camera banging one of the hosts, like a “creepy necro perv,” so she uses that to get in to see her would-be killer host. She takes her findings to Bernard Lowe (Jeffrey Wright): a laser-based satellite uplink. The hosts are being used to smuggle information out of the park.
At a freaky orgy party, Nine Inch Nails’ “Something I Can Never Have” plays on strings in the background. People fuck. Some are painted in gold. Logan, of course, loves it. William and Dolores sit on a couch, sort of equally repulsed in their own ways. Logan ends up in William’s face, they get very personal, especially the former. He digs into William, hard. At the same time Dolores wanders through the party, eventually coming upon a fortune teller with her Tarot cards. One of them laid in front of her is “the maze” – and a vision of herself reappears, telling her to follow it. She also grabs hold of a string in her forearm, pulling it bloody, her skin opening like latex. It isn’t real. But it scares her. Out in the street Lawrence is filling dead bodies in their coffins with explosives. He isn’t giving it over to the Confederados. Now, William is becoming wildly disillusioned with the creepiness of the whole game. There’s bigger problems, as the explosives turn out to be not explosive at all. And Logan takes the brunt of the fallout, being left behind by William. Dolores ends up shooting down a few men to save her new man. “I imagined a story where I didn’t have to be the damsel,” she tells William while they flee and catch a ride on a passing train. Landing right in the lap of Lawrence. This is actually the first time he introduces himself as such, since they’re all acquainted. And once more Dolores sees the mark of the maze on a coffin in the train: “Im coming,” she says. To whom? Arnold? God, I love the suspense.

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Back to the Man in Black – could he be William though? It’s intriguing – and Teddy. The pair drop by a bar. One where they run into Dr. Ford for a drink. This is a huge scene! Ford wonders exactly what Black is seeking. “I always felt like this place was missing a real villain, hence my humble contribution,” he tells the doctor. They talk about the working of the park, Black wonders if there’s anybody fit to stop him. We know for sure he’s headed for whatever happens to lie at the centre of that mysterious maze. What is it exactly? Does it represent a physical space, or could it be a component in the robots themselves? No telling. Yet. Either way, the Man in Black is dead set on finding the purpose, the truth behind it all. We also see that the hosts are quite protective of their maker, as well. So many mysteries in the artificial world of Westworld’s creations. So much to unravel.
Out in the lab the technician working on Maeve goes back to the bird. He calibrates a little then the bird flies around the room, like magic. Maeve, she’s up and about to greet the technician, Felix, and let the bird perch on her fingertip. She also wants to have a little chat with him. I wonder exactly what she’ll tell him. What sort of secrets could spill from her lips, and what is Felix getting himself into?

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An interesting episode, I must say. Lots to think about, as usual. I can’t help but wonder more about those theories surrounding the Man in Black. Next episode is titled “The Adversary” and I’m sure we’ll see more on ole Black himself.

Quarry – Season 1, Episode 8: “nước chảy đá mòn”

Cinemax’s Quarry
Season 1, Episode 8: “nước chảy đá mòn”
Directed by Greg Yaitanes
Written by Graham Gordy & Michael D. Fuller

* For a review of the penultimate episode, “Carnival of Souls” – click here
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From what I can tell, the English translation of the Vietnamese title for this episode means “flowing water wears away stone” roughly. An interesting thing to think about in terms of all the water imagery, Mac Conway’s (Logan Marshall-Green) love of swimming, and so on.
We start ten months before the current season’s timeline. The choppers fly overhead of the Vietnamese jungle. Troops are at base camp, relaxed for the moment. Mac and Arthur (Jamie Hector) get a few orders from their platoon captain. Mac watches the river carefully as a boat floats by; always suspicious, never off his guard.
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But in his present predicament Mac’s definitely off guard. Detective Tommy Olsen (Josh Randall) has him dead to rights, hoping to get more out of ole Quarry about Cliff’s death. That’s not long for this world; neither the conversation, nor Tommy. He gets his face shot off horrifically, as the carnival grounds around them come alive and bullets ring into the night. It’s Credence Mason (Ólafur Darri Ólafsson), of course. He gets his, too. Then Buddy (Damon Herriman) and Mac are left in a gunfight with some of Mason’s Dixie crew. They’re a pretty handy pair, though.
They make it back in one piece, appeasing The Broker (Peter Mullan), as well as leaving Karl (Edoardo Ballerini) with a new game of Pong to play. Things are looking pretty good for The Broker now, poised to take over the local scene. Only problem is that now Mac has walked himself into something far bigger than just killing bad dudes for money. Again, that’s the call of the wild animal in him, unleashed by the United States Army overseas.
Mac’s dad Lloyd (Skip Sudduth) has him and Joni (Jodi Balfour) over to his place. Seems Lloyd got a cash offer for the house. A small family wants to buy the place, especially excited over the pool. Out of the blue, Joni doesn’t want to sell. Not after her husband put the pool in himself, they made a home for themselves. Things don’t get any better when Lloyd’s wife drops two dirty words on Mac: “war criminal.” She thinks Mac and Joni only want money from them. A truly insulting moment. Moreover, people always assume they know exactly what happened, all because of how the media tells them and frames it for the people back home. They don’t consider how it really was for soldiers, they don’t take in all the factors. In a dirty war like Vietnam that was particularly true.
At least now Mac has the money, paid off by his stepmother to never come back, and he can pay The Broker off. Or is it that simple now? Oh, I don’t know about that. In the meantime, we flashback to Vietnam those ten months ago. Mac, Arthur, and the rest of their platoon wade through water to a spot further inland. They’re headed for Quan Thang, which we already understand is where the massacre went down, the one in which Mac and Arthur were heavily implicated to have done terrible things. Supposedly.

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Poor Mac, he’s trying to find himself a job that doesn’t involve killing anybody, or guns in any way. He applies for a job selling pools. Luckily, the guy interviewing him doesn’t really pay attention to the news. I wonder how long it’ll last before discovering who Mac is, or at least who the media implies. He’s got the job, but I can’t help feeling there’s a gut punch coming down the line.
Ruth (Nikki Amuka-Bird) has Moses (Mustafa Shakir) over for dinner. Although she still doesn’t know that’s his name. And she also doesn’t realise why he’s there in the first place. He starts sniffing around after Marcus has been fixing the TV, buying things, suspicious little clues that Moses definitely suspects has to do with Arthur’s missing cash.
When Joni and Mac go out to celebrate the new job, the former soldier has a PTSD episode where he sees that Asian mask standing in the background, staring at him. He interrupts a band playing, terrifying everybody a bit. Outside he falls to the ground nearly weeping: “Im sorry,” he repeats, over and over.
So we go back those ten months again. In an abandoned building the soldiers come across that Asian mask hung on a wall, sitting in the dark. Mac stares at it for a while, fixated on the face. Something that’s obviously stuck with him, buried in the recesses of his mind and bubbling to the front in the worst of times.
Finally we see Moses confront Marcus. He asks plainly – “Dont fuckinlie to me, son” – where the money’s stashed. He takes the cash, and makes sure to tell the kid he better keep his mouth shut. Moses threatens his family with death. That’s a bad dude.

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Later on we see Mac at the voting booth, choosing between either Nixon or McGovern. At the same time Joni’s trying to find a doctor to talk with about Mac and his PTSD. Of course back then it wasn’t known as that, or at least not treated with the appropriate respect and gravity deserved. A guy at the VA hospital hands her a pamphlet, as if that’s meant to help. He also implies that seeing as how Mac has “both his arms” and “both his legs” then there’s nothing actually wrong with him. Sickening display of what we’re seeing now as the result of all that neglect. Tons of mental illness, death by murder or suicide or whatever else, too many problems.
Buddy’s having a tough time. Sitting with his mother Naomi (Ann Dowd), he talks about survival, from the time of dinosaurs right to the Black Plague spreading across Europe. He feels like he’s done nothing with his life: “What am I doinwith it, mama?”
In ‘Nam, we see Mac and the platoon heading further to their destination. Once there they take all precautions, although Arthur notes there’s a Catholic cross at the front of their village. Either way, the platoon’s captain sends them in making clear to “fire then you ask questions.” Inside the village all hell breaks loose. Civilians are killed. Napalm lights the forest on fire and burns villagers alive. Gunfire gets exchanged between the Americans and some Viet Cong. At one point Mac throws a grenade in a hidden tunnel, where women and children scream. He sees the bloody bits of a child next to him, still moving slightly. This all but melts his brain and his psyche. We can easily see, from this POV, that Mac and Arthur, most of those guys, did not realise what they were doing, led astray by orders followed blindly. Still, they then had to go on living with what they’d done.
At home, Mac goes to meet The Broker. Instead he runs into an old face from the army, someone he isn’t so happy to see – his old captain, Thurston (Matt Nable). They catch up on things, rather contentiously. We get the impression that Thurston hasn’t repented whatsoever, in any shape, for what they did in Vietnam. He seems to want to go back, not able to adjust at all to civilian life anymore. In Thurston, Mac sees everything he hates; about himself. He reminds Mac of what they did in that fishing village. On top of it all we get another flashback to Thurston commanding his officers to execute remaining villagers, under threat of death if they won’t comply. Close by, Mac looks into the distance with heavy sorrow. Well, in the series’ current moments Mac attacks Thurston outside of the bar. They tangle a bit before he takes off after the former captain into the woods.

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Do you recognise this scene?
It’s the very first one, from the beginning of the season. This is where it all started. We witness Thurston beating Mac, holding him below the water. After he thinks Mac is dead Thurston walks off. Only to take a bullet. And here, we see Mac pump more lead into the man making sure he’s good and dead. He pushes Thurston’s corpse out into the water to float out and far away from him.
In other news, Buddy goes out cruising but ends up getting attacked by a couple men. They viciously beat him, taking his money and leaving him unconscious, or worse.
When Mac finally goes to meet The Broker he’s beaten and fucked up. That whole meeting with Thurston was, naturally, the old fella’s doing. More than that The Broker tries to keep Quarry on for another job. However, our soldier doesn’t want anything to do with him after all they’ve been through together. “Whos a fella like you vote for?” Mac asks The Broker. He also says he “wrote someone in” on the ballot: Otis Redding. We discover The Broker hasn’t voted “since Truman.” Kind of fitting. Likewise, we discover Mac misses war. Not hard to tell.
Flashback to the war. Thurston receives a visit from none other than The Broker. He’s walked through Quan Thang. This is where Conway’s name first comes up for the old gentleman. The Broker takes a stroll in through the trees, to where a field is full of the ripe, beautiful plants needed for processing heroin. Ah, and it all comes together. Very interesting political twist on the Quan Thang.

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Buddy – or Sebastian, as we find out – makes it home to his mother, beaten into bloody pulp. Detective Verne Ratliff (Happy Anderson) has one last look at Cliff Williams’ book of lyrics. President Nixon is announced to have won on live television. And Ruth, she finds that Moses is no longer waiting for her at the diner, but sitting home with the found money, contemplating his next move.
On the shoreline Mac sits with his next kit – gun, money, name. He got himself out, yet allows himself to be sucked back in. The carnage of war has crept into his veins, important as the blood flowing through them. Meanwhile, The Broker plays him like a fiddle.
Then we see Mac strip down for a swim out into the river, perhaps doing the only thing he can to not think about everything other dark thing swirling around his entire existence.


What a beautiful, gritty, importantly relevant series! Man, this first season was a blast. With the finale episode and its flashbacks, the revelations, Quarry cements itself as one of the greats, up there with any of the best HBO has had to offer over the past 20 years. Truly amazing writing, lots of fine acting, as well as solid directing.
Cinemax: do what’s right. Give this show a second, third, fourth season. C’mon. Do not pass this up. There’s a lot of other important stories to tell in the world of Mac Conway.