Tagged Lou Reed

Vinyl – Season 1, Episode 5: “He in Racist Fire”

HBO’s Vinyl
Season 1, Episode 5: “He in Racist Fire”
Directed by Peter Sollett
Written by Adam Rapp

* For a review of the previous episode, “The Racket” – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “Cyclone” – click here
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Moving further through 1973, we’re back with Richie Finestra (Bobby Canavale), as he tries to juggle professional life, his family life with Devon (Olivia Wilde), and at the same time does his best to keep his involvement in the murder of Buck Rogers under wraps. Seems tough, right? Well, a little zip of cocaine and Richie can face the insurmountable odds no problem. Or can he?
This episode begins with a part Led Zeppelin-part Jethro Tull knock-off, wearing costumes and all – Wizard Fist. What a name. They perform at Renaissance fairs and such. Brutal. A bunch of other bands go on and on, as Richie listens, alongside an unimpressed Julie (Max Casella), and the ringleader of this apparent night out, Clark Morelle (Jack Quaid).
Heading off, Richie gets a call from his father Vince (David Proval). He chews his son out a bit over the alibi Richie requested. “Fuckinbig shot,” Vince eggs him on.


Richie: “Theres more than one way to be dead, pop.”
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Julie calls Clark in for a talk. There are firings going around, and Clark starts to suspect he’s gone; he’s right. “Youre fired, kid,” Julie tells him. The show the night before was certainly that one last nail in his coffin. But poor Clark’s left in tears, begging for his job. Instead he ends up with a pay cut – taking the job of Jamie Vine (Juno Temple). Because nowadays Jamie has other things to do. Meanwhile, Cece (Susan Heyward) appears to have a whole other thing going on, showing up “in a limo” in the morning, as well as other things. Damn, girl.
In the board room, Lester Grimes (Ato Essandoh) and his new client Kip Stevens (James Jagger) about promotional label “bullshit” for radio stations around the country. Kip wants Jamie in there with them and tells the whole room: “Im Kip Stevens, fuck your mom; theres my bio.” Richie and the label are doing label-type things, attempting to break apart The Nasty Bits. Almost the way Jim Morrison, and other lead singers, found themselves attacked by label dudes who “groom” talent and try to take the supposed star onward, upward, away from their bands.
One thing I’m starting to love about Vinyl is how Jamie has really, despite all odds, carved a niche out for herself, amongst all the sexism and the nonsense around her. Temple is a solid actor anyways. Here, she gets to show lots of that.
Cece lets Richie know about Hannibal (Daniel J. Watts) possibly being lured to another label, by the greasy Jackie Jarvis (Ken Marino). This clearly worries Richie, and shakes him up. Just as he seemed to be doing all right. He calls Devon and cons her into a date, which is actually him trying to “impress” a client.


Richie: “You up for some fondue? If not we can fondont. Go somewhere else.”
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Jamie’s worried about her job, as Clark is in her position now. No promotion for her, though. I suppose at least she’s still got a job while others are being sacked. Still, raw deal for bringing in a new act.
Out on a photo shoot, Richie goes to see Andrea Zito (Annie Parisse). They’ve got a complicated past. It’s clear Richie abused their relationship in some ways, giving too little while taking too much. He wants her to help the label, but she gives him options on how to bring her into the fold. Richie tries to sell her hard: “Youll have a voice, okay. Im different, Andy.”
At a high class restaurant, Jamie meets with a woman, obviously her mother, who she lies to about a promotion with American Century Records. But she gets the reply: “Youre an embarrassment.”


In the office, Richie finds his father laughing and drinking with employees. Vince calls himself “just an old horn player“, yet it is extremely clear that Richie cares about his opinion. And things go on devolving until they’re basically at each others throat. But Vince is at odds even more now with his son needing that alibi. After discovering the nefarious shit Richie’s involved with, Vince is feeling worse.
A brief Little Richard (CJ Lacey) interlude, as he woos and wails his way away. Beauty.
In the studio, Jamie listens to The Nasty Bits rock hard. It is super raw and sounds a bit brutal. Eventually, Kip gets into an argument with his guitar player, calling him “lazy“; Jamie’s rubbing off on him. Yet after the session when Lester arrives, there’s trouble – he fires the guitarist, tough and to the point.
Out at dinner, Richie’s entertaining Hannibal best he can. Lots of fun, some laughs. The title of the episode comes from an anagram of Richie Finestra out of Hannibal, displaying a talent for coming up with them.
There’s still the problem of Kip and his heroin. He has the addiction and he’s afraid nobody is around to “take the knocks” with him. In comes Jamie, promising just that.


While Devon and Hannibal dance, Richie snorts some coke in the bathroom. He joins everybody and they’re all having fun. Just like normal people. Things get a little too sexual, as Hannibal and Devon dance with lust. Richie hauls Cece into his lap forcibly, which she doesn’t appreciate much. Soon enough, you can see the look in Richie’s eyes go dark while Devon enjoys Hannibal, quite a bit. The night ends abruptly. But Richie brought her there to impress, for the purpose of business, and he got upset when things went south. I don’t blame her. I blame him. Maybe Hannibal a bit, as well. Either way things get hot and heavy in the elevator before getting complicated. She knows she was “bait” and then reveals there was no plan to bang Hannibal, just a blow in the bathroom for Richie from a faithful wife. He goes way too far before getting smacked.


Richie: “Want a bump?”
Hannibal: “I dont need a bump. I got a bump.”
Devon: “Why yes you do, sir.”
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The cops have got Richie’s place bugged. They heard the conversation between Papa Finestra and his son. With further and further evidence, how long does Richie have before cuffs click on those wrists?
Richie gets a call later from Jarvis, who’s just signed Hannibal. Wow. Just, wow. Not particularly impressed with Hannibal at this point, either.
We get a great Lou Reed (Connor Hanwick) scene, “White Light, White Heat” rocking over the crowd. At the same time, Devon heads into the Hotel Chelsea, while Richie’s at the club with Lou onstage and talking to Andrea. Their history becomes clearer with each conversation. He has really insulted two important women in his life in this episode, though, Andrea gets a slight satisfaction out of Richie’s revelations. Regardless, she gets in on the label. Another extra dimension to Richie and his life filling up with madness. Lots of things are adding up. Will he go too far, again, and cheat on Devon?

This was an intense episode. Can’t wait to see “Cyclone” next! Stay tuned with me, fellow fans.

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Vinyl – Season 1, Episode 2: “Yesterday Once More”

HBO’s Vinyl
Season 1, Episode 2: “Yesterday Once More”
Directed by Allen Coulter
Written by Terence Winter

* For a review of the pilot – click here
* For a review of the next episode, “Whispered Secrets” – click here
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Open on Richie Finestra (Bobby Cannavale) watching a martial arts flick with Bruce Lee on the big screen, attempting the moves himself, all the while snorting coke. Problem is he’s not alone and “disturbing the other patrons” causing troubles.
Cut to Zak Yankovich (Ray Romano), Skip Fontaine (J.C. MacKenzie) and Scott Levitt (P.J. Byrne) trying to stall the Germans, as Richie is quite late. Zak reels off a story, everyone laughing and trying to play things up.
At the Finestra house, the television is left smashed with the Bo Diddley guitar still in it. Devon (Olivia Wilde) gets a call from Zak, letting him know about the Richie bender. She’s absolutely not impressed with her husband, though, she puts on a good face for the children. At the office, Zak slips some pills in order to cope with the stress; he does not look happy, either. And finally, up shows Richie looking like death walking – he’s still bleeding, covered in dust from the collapse at the New York Dolls show. Seems like Richie has a God complex now, or something similar. He feels almost invincible, between the cocaine and surviving the building falling down on top of him. He says they aren’t selling the company, then a wild scene breaks out as the boys try to calm their friend down. My favourite bit so far? The cuts to Jerry Lee Lewis (Lance Lapinsky) playing “Breathless” in a silhouetted, smokey frame.


Bottom line – Richie’s renewed his love of rock n’ roll. Then he pulls out some Bruce Lee shit on his buddies, except for Skip who dives over the couch to avoid an ass-kicking. “Is this how you do business in America?” asks one of the Germans. “Take a hike you Nazi prick,” Richie replies. Stumbling away with Zak and Scott bleeding, Skip tells them: “Its like the lottery in fuckinreverse.” Over in his own office, Richie talks with Julie Silver (Max Casella), who wants to know what’s happening. Everyone seems to know what sort of guy Richie is, obviously he’s had problems in the past of which everybody at the office is aware. But Julie’s got no problem doing a bit of coke with the boss.
Now we switch over to Devon, who daydreams of a time before. Lou Reed (Connor Hanwick) plays with The Velvet Underground, as Andy Warhol (John Cameron Mitchell) and others sit around watching them. Richie is there looking quite different, as is Devon; before they were together. Devon takes pictures and Richie casually asks about her a little, they lock eyes and a connection is clearly imminent. In a bathroom, they meet and form an instant, steamy bond. Outside, Lou and the band rock on to “Run, Run, Run”. Coming back to reality, Devon drives on listening to a song on the radio, seeing Karen Carpenter in the car next to her – until she realizes her children aren’t in the car with them. She forgot the kids, but turns back quickly.
Meanwhile, Richie is busy shaping his staff up for the new regime. “Take that fuckinJefferson Airplane poster with you,” he screams at an employee, firing him and tossing his ass out the door. Richie wants kick ass, balls to the wall music, he wants everybody to start looking for the best stuff with the right kick. A hilarious scene, though, sort of disturbing because we know Richie’s off the wagon hardcore. Afterwards, Jamie Vine (Juno Temple) heads in to talk with her boss. She wants to know if he thought The Nasty Bits were any good, which he says they were, but they need an “MC5” sort of thing to give them better edge. Richie gives Jamie a chance to show what she’s worth by setting up a showcase for the band, plus she also hauls some coke out of her bra just as he asks for another vial; the look on his eyes spell THANK YOU. “If you ever rat me out again to Richie, Ill kick you in the fucking cunt,” Jamie quietly tells the receptionist on her way out.


Devon is reliving part of her old life, too. She takes pictures of the television with the Bo Diddley axe in it, artistically framed and such. Then receives a call from the police informing her of Richie’s car being near the building collapse, which obviously worries her as she hasn’t seen her husband yet. Even though he’s just at the office, coked up.
Zak is getting his daughter’s Bat Mitzvah ready. Only now the money is racking up and the deal isn’t going through. On top of all that, his nose is smashed to bits. Things are getting heavy for Zak now, but he takes it half decently. For now.
Another scene cut in here of a musician playing – this time, Bobby Bland (Jo’ell Jackson) sings “I’ll Take Care of You”, crooning away. Cut to Devon finding Bobby in the shower, upset at him yet glad he’s alive. For his part, he loves her. Maybe he’s fucked up, he definitely is. But he loves her, and she loves him, too. Only he can’t let her know what the real pressure happening is about; he claims it’s work, his birthday. It’s the murder, though. Clearly.
And right after they start to talk, a detective shows up: homicide division. It isn’t about Buck. It’s about Maury Gold (Paul Ben-Victor), his association with the mob, and a recent murder tying them all together. One the cop leaves, Richie breaks down: “Im a bad person,” he cries to his wife, weeping in her lap.
Flashback to hanging with Andy and all those folk. Richie has a slightly different look, now he and Devon are together. They’re all taking drugs, relaxing at what is likely The Factory. Andy’s a little jealous of Richie, being Devon’s boyfriend and all. When Andy comes over he is coy, faux-friendly, but somehow slightly sweet. Richie talks Devon into going on camera for Andy, which only requires her to sit there and look nice. The whole time she and Richie look at one another across the room.


Julie’s busy with Jamie, listening to The Nasty Bits. He is not impressed; not with the singer Kip (James Jagger) or his voice, not with the music, none of it. Julie does his best to explain how they can “suck less” and lays out the way they’ll impress Richie, as well as possibly get signed. This includes learning a Kinks tune to play for the boss, to which The Nasty Bits agree after a bit of whinging.
Having a worse is Zak, whose life becomes more and more a pain with each minute. His money problems are spiraling now that their huge deal for the label isn’t going through. I can feel something building, but what? Where will Zak turn? His wife certainly isn’t making it any better, having become accustomed to their obviously fairly lavish lifestyle. He gets out of bed and heads to the garage. In his car, he seems to contemplate taking a handful of pills then decides against it. Instead, he beats the hell out of the back-end with a wrench.
Flashback to the old days of Richie and Devon, as their present isn’t so wonderful. They’re hanging with The Factory crowd a little more, everyone drinking, making out, so on. Things were once incredible.
Back to ’73, as Devon wakes up to find Richie gone, their bed empty. Out on the street, Richie looks all business. He’s in the black neighbourhood where we saw him get a gun pulled on him during the pilot, where we saw his brief reunion with Lester Grimes (Ato Essandoh). Richie carries a huge envelope inside, right to the door of Lester who reluctantly lets his old friend inside: “We gotta talk,” says Richie.


This was an excellent follow-up to the first two-hour extravaganza from Martin Scorsese. Looking forward to the next episode, “Whispered Secrets” – stay tuned with me!

Fear the Walking Dead – Season 1, Episode 4: “Not Fade Away”

AMC’s Fear the Walking Dead
Season 1, Episode 4: “Not Fade Away”
Directed by Kari Skogland
Written by Meaghan Oppenheimer

* For a review of the next episode, “Cobalt” – click here
* For a review of the previous episode, “The Dog” – click here
IMG_1992This episode starts with Lou Reed’s “Perfect Day” playing over a montage of what’s now the new normal in Los Angeles neighbourhoods.
Travis (Cliff Curtis) jogs through the fenced in area of the their neighbourhood. His son Chris (Lorenzo James Henrie) sits on top of the roof and talks to his camera, in the distance noticing a flash; is it a signal, gunfire, or something else? Either way, Chris says: “Hello
IMG_1993For the time being, Travis and his son, Madison (Kim Dickens), Alicia (Alycia Debnam-Carey), and the still detoxing Nick (Frank Dillane) are all trying to get along with normal life; quote unquote normal, anyways. At the same time, Liza (Elizabeth Rodriguez) is off helping others.
Either way the friction is real, it is constant. Even Alicia acknowledges there’s nothing normal anymore.
Back on top of the house, Chris discovers the signal flashing back to him as he tries to signal it. He tries to show his father, though, Travis has no part of it. Clearly it is someone and Travis knows this, worrying too much. Will he got out on his own? Is he going to do something dumb? We’ll see.
Madison and son, Nick, are also dealing with a slight bit of friction. Although it seems Nick is trying to kick the junk a bit more proactively, his mother’s only concerned for him and questions whether or not “forgetting” to take his medication is the best thing or not. Regardless, Nick acts as if he’s willing to get clean and swims around in a dirty pool while acting fairly non-chalant about it all.
IMG_1995The National Guard has moved in. They’re not only occupying the neighbourhood in order to keep things under control, they impose lots of rules – obviously – but as Travis sees quickly, these troops mean business; strict fucking business.
Travis is called on to deal with the Thompson family, who are apparently holed up in their house and will not comply with the National Guard. Lieutenant Moyers (Jamie McShane) makes it clear, Travis either helps get him to go along, or the Guard is going to take him down.
Unfortunately, Doug Thompson (John Stewart) is having a bit of a hard time telling his children what’s been happening. Yet luckily Travis is able to get Doug calmed down, thinking level-headed. A testament to the level-headedness of Travis, but there are things even this quality won’t help him with in the days, weeks, months… years… to come. Depending on how long he makes it.
IMG_2008Nick proves fairly fast his lying self is prevalent. Seeing Liza leave a sick neighbour’s house, he sneaks himself into the room and hooks himself up to an old, obviously near death patient’s IV all to get his fix. Despicable, sad, all at once.
He and his mother have a confrontation later where she basically beats him up, briefly, telling him “You have no idea“. While it’s sad to see a mom have to essentially kick the shit out of her junkie son, it’s something certain junkies ACTUALLY need (coming from someone who is nearly 7 years clean from drugs & 6 years sober from alcohol).
What’s worse is the fact Madison is trying hard to be positive, trying to hard to be there and be strong, all for her family. All the while, Nick is shitting all over the trust she gave him earlier.
The thing I love is the writing here concerning the family. There’s a parallel between the sons, each giving the two parents grief. Nick is bad enough, but then there’s Chris who – maybe rightfully – won’t let go of the fact he saw a flash out in the distance, out where, supposedly, there aren’t any people.
Clearly, though, Nick is worse.
That night, Madison flashes a light on her own at the top of their roof. Finally, after a few flashes, one comes back and she gets confirmation Chris actually saw someone out there. Who is it? The suspense is already killing me, honestly. Loving it.
IMG_1996Everything gets more and more tense once Doug Thompson disappears in his car. Obviously Travis didn’t do such a great job talking Doug down earlier. He tries to talk with Lt. Moyers, but this guy is a REAL douche. No doubt on that one.
It feels a bit sketchy once Moyers gets sort of standoff-ish after Travis mentions his son saw a light in the DZ (for those who don’t happen to know: DZ, or DMZ, means demilitarized zone). The lieutenant passes it off, forgetting it right away, but it’s the way he’s body language speaks: you know the guy is lying, he knows something, he knows what the military knows and you can bet it’s nasty.
IMG_1997One of my favourite scenes so far in this first season of Fear the Walking Dead happens when Madison, albeit irresponsibly (and I thought Chris would be the dummy to attempt this), heads out through the National Guard implemented fence, cutting a hole through a tiny section and making her way into the DZ.
At first there’s this intense bit where we watch as Madison walks through these desolate bits of neighbourhood, everything destroyed or abandoned. Then come the dead bodies, a stench washing over her. And BAM – out comes a military vehicle, troops in tow. This was an incredibly tense sequence. These moments amped up higher than they would have even with the excellent cinematography and overall production design, all due to an amazing score from Paul Haslinger.
IMG_1999 IMG_2002 IMG_2003 IMG_2005 IMG_2006Dr. Bethany Exner (Sandrine Holt) is now roaming the neighbourhood. In private, she outs Liza to her face as not being a real nurse, and they sort of… strike a deal. Now, she’s heading through the neighbourhood, checking everyone out.
Griselda Salazar (Patricia Reyes Spíndola) is being eyed to have sugery under Dr. Exner. It’s hard to tell whether or not Daniel Salazar (Rubén Blades) is willing to let that happen.
But he tells Madison a story, as they’re together after her adventure outside the fence, about how the government came and took some people from where he lived; they did not come back, only ended up dead. His whole point is that if he goes, and does not come back, she needs to be there for Ofelia Salazar (Mercedes Mason). I thought this was a really great scene, Rubén Blades is an awesome actor whose credibility adds something to this cast of characters of which I’m a big fan.
IMG_2009When the shady Dr. Exner and the National Guard come to take Griselda, things get extremely tension-filled and a bit scary.
First, they refuse to take Daniel with his wife, as the only other name on the list is Nicholas Clark. Second, in the struggle to get Nick after Alicia tells him to run, the National Guardsmen draw their guns on everyone, from Daniel to Chris. It provokes everyone. Everything goes mad in those few moments and the troops take Nick, Griselda, and even – though willing – Liza.
What’s even wilder is that in the final few moments of the episode, Travis goes up to the roof in grief as everyone else left does their own thing, each reeling. Up on top of the house, Travis not only sees confirmation of a flashing light out in the DZ, he witnesses big bangs, flashes of light, and realizes someone has been killed. No doubt after Lt. Moyers caught wind of it from him, another party of troops went out to sweep the area, finding them in the night naturally and snuffing out the problem. Incredibly intense and disturbing as hell.
One thing’s for sure – Madison and Travis are headed for rough territory, as Liza is the cause of all this nonsense at the close of the episode. Maybe not fair, however, the only reason she was there was due to the fact Travis wanted her to be; being the mother of his boy and all. Still, there’s going to be some trouble in the house amongst everything else going on outside in the devastation that is Los Angeles.
IMG_2010 IMG_2011Looking forward big time to the penultimate episode of the first season, “Cobalt”, which is again directed by Kari Skogland. I like how the number of directors has been cut down in this first season, it gives directors the chance to sort of bridge episodes together instead of simply doing six one-off directed episodes by six different directors. Gives the season continuity in that sense, to me anyways. I think Robert Kirkman and Co. have a good thing on their hands with this series, even though the naysayers will, no doubt, continually naysay. Digging it over this way!
Stay tuned for more reviews, my friends! #FearTWD